An Axe Man’s Bucksaw Part 1

This obe is otherwise known as The Moon Saw. That name to be explained later though. 🙂

I’ve been wanting to do this project for a couple months now. Took a while to get other things out of the way… Pressing household maintenance like broken water tanks, and no running water kept cropping up! (Among other little things that Eat time).

I knew I wanted to do a 24″ saw, so I went and picked up a blade early last month. I actually got a whole swede saw. A blade was $8. A Fiskars saw with the blade was $11. Yeah, might as well buy the $3 saw with it, and have it!

Then it took a month for me to get time, and some shop space made to do it.

I neded some large paper for patterning another project, so I sat down and started drawing designs. I could have gone with dead simple straight side/handle bars, and been a LOT simpler and easier…

Bug I figured if I was going to do it, I might as well do what I liked.

The one I built is actually the second design I had drawn, and while the other was thought out over 3 days, this one I drew and finalized in 10 minutes. And liked it more!

(Original design on left, axe style on right)

You can see where the name comes from, if you notice the fawns foot handle ends, and “S” shapes. I had my hatchet handle on the bench at the time, and was holding it, such a nice grip; So I traced it, reversed it, traced again, and blended the contours some.

Simple!

More to be seen soon.

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Categories: Adventure Metal Works, Axes, Backcountry, Camping gear, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Hunting, New Gear, Outdoors, wood processing, Woods tools, Woodshop, Woodwork | Leave a comment

Goodbye old friend?

Well, if anyone sees this fella in the wild, corral him if he pleases… I managed to misplace him while out and about this last weekend. 😦

Hoping, if I can’t find him, and I doubt I could, –it happened somewhere in 3 days afield in a variety of places, I doubt he’s anywhere close to home– but I hope someone finds him, and even if i couldn’t, they could take possession, instead of his rusting away somewhere. 🙂

Now, what’s amazing, is I usually lose something on days where I’m on my back working… Under trucks, crawl spaces, etc. They slide from pockets then.

The day I’m sure I miss placed it(3.17.18), I was busy and working at church, but never that I can think of, in any place or position that I could have slipped anything out of a pocket.

Dont remember using it at all, where I could have left it laying either. Strange!

Checked one buddies pickup seats whom I’d rode with, and asked him to check his couch where I was a few minutes… Checked my truck. Nope.

Wouldn’t be so bad if I just knew where or how I lost it, even if I couldn’t get it back… It’s the unknown how, where, and why that’s the worst of it!

Categories: Daily-cary-log, EDC, knives, Lost Items, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

February into March 2018 EDC

Pics taken Feb. 5th up to March 15th.

Categories: Daily-cary-log, EDC, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Grip frame fun, 1.0? 

Killing time in the shop and tried the brass 1860 style grip frame(that I have for converting my Ruger Blackhawk) on my Beretta Stampede.  Rear frame fits good, but would need a filler at the bottom front, and the ears trimmed to the gun frame if it was to stay.   





Looks like the front strap, trigger guard holes line up close enough to go on, but the trigger slot in it is far too narrow.  Had the same issue on the Blackhawk. 

I might compare Ruger and Beretta triggers, and open the 1860 guard up to fit both, if I can. 

I’m actually not sure if this brass frame set will ever get onto the Ruger. I’ve grown rather fond of the grip on the Blackhawk as it is, with the nice wood grips I put on last spring. Much nicer and slimmer than the rubber that came on it. Not sure I really need the slimmer 1860 style on it now.   We shall see. 

One nice thing, IF I do mount it to the Stampede,  it has the same flat main spring style as the 1860, so little serious modification, if any would be needed. 

IE, it could still later be converted to the Ruger mainspring, etc. just as easily as ever. 
If nothing else, I can fit the backstrap to the Beretta,  leaving the guard alone to be fit to the Ruger later, and then simply get another back strap then. 

As I said, we shall see. Just thinking out loud, as it were, for the time being. 

Categories: Brass, Cowboy, Customized, Guns, Gunsmithing, Modifications, Revolvers

Shelf Track Bench Dogs

“Shelf what??” Your saying, right? 😉 

Bench dogs are pins, or flat jaws, that slip into dog holes– holes in the top of a work bench, for holding thing on the bench top. 

You clamp the work piece between the dog and the vice at the edge of the bench, or a bar clamp/C clamp or two. With a large grid of holes, you can hold just about anything in any position. 

I like the concept but hate the idea of having all the holes in the bench. Seems a great way to ruin a layout surface,  and a place to lose hardware. 

Then I saw this trick/tip that a fellow sent in to this month’s issue of Woodsmith magazine;

It uses cabinet shelf support rails and clip brackets as simple in line dogs for the vise; GENIUS! 

After pricing the track and clips, $3 for 6′ of track, and about $3 for 12 clips… Yeah, no brainer dude! 😉 

15 minutes with my router, and I have bench dogs!   Was a little fiddly to do, only have a 1/2″ straight cut bit, but the tracks are 5/8″ so I had to cut each channel twice for width. Track is 3/16″ thick, wanted it at least flush, I cut about 7/32″ deep to garantee it can’t catch on anything when not in use. 



Clips in place;


Then I just made the old front jaw front the vise into the cammed over jaw insert needed. Great to use that vise to make things for the vise! (Really have no idea how I survived so long without that vise!)

It works!

A few strategically placed screws makes a storage spot for the vice jaw under the end of the bench. 

And the left over ~11″ of track made a clip storage rack. 


Can’t beat simple, cheap and easy, especially if it works! 

Categories: Custom, custom-made-tools, Customized, Fabrication, Modifications, Repurpose, Shop Tools, Woodshop, Woodwork

Walnut Mystery Cube

One of last night’s little projects, something I’ve been wanting to try.  A fidget cube, fidget toy, mystery cube, cube in a cube, puzzle like brain teaser made from walnut.

 Really simple to make once you know a few tricks, I saw it on YouTube and had to try it!  






Yes, its all from one piece, the inner cube started in there! 

Managed to cut the same thumb twice in 15 minutes, in the same way, while rounding/carving off the corners.. lol slow learner.


 The walnut wood is a chunk a friend gave me about a decade ago, from a tree his dad cut down some 50 years ago.. Cube is headed to being a gift for one of the friends grandkids, great grandkids of the tree cutter.  Seemed a fitting piece of wood to use. 😎👍

  Here it’s soaking up its first coat of Watco butcher block oil a first time use for me, for a food safe/kid safe/they can chew on it all they want, safe finish 😉😆 

Categories: carving, Sentimental, Woodshop, Woodwork

EDC January 2018

All the EDC/pocket dump pics I took in January of 2018. 🙂

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Categories: Daily-cary-log, EDC, knives, Uncategorized

Pipe clamp bench vise 1.0

Needed a good easy place to clamp some large pieces of wood to the bench to work them for an upcoming project.   Reminded me I’d wanted to build a traditional woodworkers bench side vise.. 

While digging around online, I found this concept on youtube. Not as traditional or elegant as the all wood single screw style I had in mind, but it’s easier, faster and would cost me nothing; perfect! 

Few feet of 2″x4″, some 1″x8″, some screws, and a set of pipe clamps I wasn’t using, and about 2 hours;

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After a few days on there, the front jaw board warped on me.  In its defense I ripped it down from a 12″ width, so it was used to haveing more support… 

Others building these are laminating up to about 2″ or 3″ thick, but I  figure I don’t need that stability, nor want to take the time for it now.  Now it seems I might have to just to stiffen it up. 

I then put a new face of oak on it. Should be more stable and warp less. Later I’ll laminate it up to 2 or 3 thicknesses if I need to. 

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I honestly don’t know how I ever got anything done before,  it’s so wonderfully handy to have!

Categories: carving, custom-made-tools, Fabrication, Shop Tools, Uncategorized, Woodshop, Woodwork

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