Work Tools

Craftsman 4V power screwdriver

Picked this up last weekend on sale, I was curious,  and for $35, figured it was a small risk.

It’s the old concept of a power screwdriver,  remember those from the 90s? Even in the early 2000s when cordless tools were gaining ground and power those things were still basically useless.

Somewhere I have one thats about 9v, that came with my big 18v Dewalt drill, circa 2006. That drill was a power house, a monster at driving screws for construction… The screwdriver,  not so much. Not exactly useless… But then the tool itself was too big to really be handy.

Batteries and motors sure have come a long ways! 

This thing is only 4V, but it has a surprising amount of torque,  and so far great run time IMO for its size.

Built in battery,  an oddity these days,  came with a wall wart w/cord that charges it. 

My main idea was for automotive work,  where you can have lots of little screws, a slow pain by hand, but an impact driver is overkill, or won’t fit.

So far I’ve had great fun with it installing a bunch of door knobs and latch plates at work,  removing and installing cabinet hinges, and even driving some small 1.25″ construction screws(amazingly well even without pilot holes!) .

Finally a compact power screwdriver that works as needed! Its a keeper!

One nifty feature, is the onboard rotating bit storage.  Has a little door that covers it. Came with bits in it! Little magnet on top next to it to hold screws or bits is actually kinda handy too.

Wish my big 20v impact drivers had that bit storage magazine!  Thinking they could do it in brushless tools and still be pretty compact.

Categories: Automotive Work, Construction, Cordless Tools, Craftsman, New Work Tools, Remodeling, Reviews, Work Tools | Leave a comment

Olight Swivel Work Light, first impression/mini review.

Just got this in on Saturday.

https://olightworld.com/olight-swivel

I ordered it from OlightDirect, here;

https://www.ebay.com/itm/165098614945

Unboxing;

Included a very nice, long USB-C cable. So many lights and things come with a 3″ cable anymore,  this was a nice surprise.  You can actually get it onto a table or the floor to charge it, instead of dangling it from the outlet.

Fresh from the box;

For scale;

First thoughts; heavy!

Second;  well, it should be durable…

I’d swear the thing is solid metal cased, but it says ABS. It’s built like a tank!  I’m sure it weighs twice what my Spirit does, heavier than any other light I have. Big 2600mAh battery has to be heavy too.

Its Big enough I’d bet its two 18650s in there.

Definitely Not a pocket carry light!

Flashlight modes are 200 and 50 lumens.

Flood light is 400, 160, 12.

The outputs all look right to me, except I’d swear the flood low is 30 or 40… but its a soft flood, wide area, guess it could look brighter than I’m used to 12 being.

The flashlight is one big smooth spot… no real discernible hotspot, bug I wouldn’t call it a flood beam… in between concepts. 

Its a rather easy interface, although I find the button a little hard to “read”. Easy to press, but its… odd. Its a soft click button under a hard rubber cover. Hard start to the press then the switch clicks fast… hard to describe.  Works fine just feels different than the average flashlight switch.

Single click on/off, click to cycle modes(only within 3sec of on, after that clicks off or swap between emitters) Long press to change between emitters.

Little odd that the flashlight starts in high then low. But on the work light/COB it goes medium, high, low.  No memory, always starts the same.

Does memory the emiter your on though…  so if you turn it off in flashlight mode it comes back on in that.

Charging is done by the verry handy built in USB plug, and thankfully in the new C standard,  matching my phone and another light; less cords to keep track of!

Came charged to 3/4 charge indictors. Took 20 mintues to go to 4/4.   Like the indicator, nice feature, always on with either emitter on.  Odd break down of percentages per the manual(4 lights actually means 95%+ not 100%), but honestly who cares that much, its a good rule of thumb for not running it dead,  better as you use a light more, learn how long you have left once it hits 1 or 2 indicators.

Magnets aren’t as strong as I expected.  Small and wide spread on the loop, its going to need a large area to stick to, to be stable.   I stuck it up to the door pilar in my truck and its rock solid, not going to move.

Stuck to flats on a 1″ steel bar with just two magnets in line, and it would shift depending on what angle you had it open; weight distribution. And I’m not 100% sure it’d stay there fully upside down..

Can see that being an issue in more creative spaces where you might not have a place to get the balance right for where you need light… time will tell I guess.

On the flip side, smaller and weaker they’re not going to collect near as much metal dust/debris in a tool bag.

The carabiner clip is… not bad, but different; the gate opens outwards.  Works fine, just not what you expect.

Nifty bonus, the halo ring around the COB is GITD.

Only thing I would really like to have seen is a rotating joint where the light body meets that hinge. So many more options for aiming it then.  Again, time will tell if its really an issue or not.

Overall,  so far, I’m very happy with it! Light function is fine, and the build seems great!

 For the $28 I paid shipped,  I think its a good value.  Wish it was a bit less, @ around $25 point I’d get a couple more of them.  $35 is the standard price online for this color, $40 for other colors. That much each is a bit much for multiples,  but that’s me being picky about $10 lol…  I think its definitely worth the ~$30.

They do a few colors, green, blue, orange, yellow,  and I think black. Looks like the green is the standard/basic, as I said it costs a little less everywhere, so thats what I got.

Categories: EDC, Flashlights, New Gear, Reviews, Usage Reviews, Work Tools | Leave a comment

Bent?

Must have caught my knife clip on something…

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Less than a minute with the Spirit fixed it.

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Tough clip though, was putting a lot of twist on the Spirit jaws to do it! Light build of the knife, I was a little worried about bending the frame/liner. But it worked fine.

Categories: Construction, Damages, EDC, EDC/MT use, knives, MacGyver, Multitools, Remodeling, Repairs, Work Tools, Work/Job

New At Work Pocket Tools 2.0

Well, I’ll be damned!

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If youll remember my last pson thus topic, what i was really needing then was one of these that included an R2/S2 bit.

This one is as yoh can see 9 in 1, including an R2!
I honestly don’t count the socket sizes except maybe the 1/4″ so it 6 in 1 or 7 in 1 for me.

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Cool setup with short and long double bits.

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Same size as the Stanley, thankfully not any bigger. It is a touch heavier, but I had it on me, same pocket as the Stanley is usually in, all day yesterday and never knew the difference.

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The Stanley has been performing perfectly fine for over a month, almost two actually, so i really didn’t need this change. But on principal of being what id wanted before, I went ahead and snagged it.

Cant really lose, it was almost as cheap(low cost) @$10.

Categories: Construction, EDC, New Gear, New Work Tools, Remodeling, Work Tools, Work/Job

New At Work Pocket Tools.

New for the work carry this summer.

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I LOVE my slim compact Kobalt screwdrivers. Takes 1 bit, holds 3 in the handle. Slim and light.
But also deathly slow, and a bit fiddly with gloves on, to change bits.
Broke down and got a cheap 6 in 1. (4 drivers, 2 nut drivers… the later of which I will rarely if ever use) Cheapest, lightest one they had. Its bulky, but actually not too heavy. Stanley, like $3.
Dont like the special double ended bits, cant just use any old 1.5″ 1/4″ drive bit. And No R2 bit.
Will see how long it lasts. If I can do ok on the bits, I might take the handle to the bandsaw and slim it down.

;)

Anyone know where I can get the fancy double ended 5/16″ hex bit it takes, or the 1/4″, in a R2/P2, or R2/1/4″ flat even, let me know.
The cutters were the cheapest also, but are good and solid. Didn’t feel like paying $22 for Chanellock. This was $10.
The ones I have are great for my auto wiring/electronic projects, and are pretty heavy duty, even good for average home wiring. But for construction site use where you cut romex, and things other than wire, I needed a set with the shorter jaw/high torque pivot location. Thankfully not much bigger than the others, and about the same weight
The old and new

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I got gloves again too. Been wearing deerskin learher of the same brand last season, and so far this one… But we’re doing vapor barrier now, and black death is impossible to remove from leather gloves, worse than it is from your hands. And those leather suckers are $22 a pair. (Yes, I won’t buy side cutters that’ll last a decade for $22, but I will pay that for gloves that last about 7 months. Yes, I know I’m odd. ) these are almost as comfortable after a day or two, and probably almost as durable. I just cry less when theyre ruined.

(for those that don’t know, black death is the slang term for a non hardening, non setting, forever sticky acoustical and vapor barier sealant and adheasive. It never dries or sets, and is tacky like tar. Its impossible to get off you once you get it on you. Gasoline or paint thinner will eat it. In my experience even then its hard to get off. )

Also grabbed one of these little guys. Figured why not, @ $0.97

:D

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So, its interesting. The big yellow Stanley takes a 1/4″ bit on one end only, on the other it is 5/16″.

In this little Stanley, the bits are Smaller than 1/4″. BUT it looks like the tool is molded at the ends to take 1/4″ bits. Except it doesnt quote fit a [img] g4″ bit. The smaller bits are gripped further into the handle though. Strange.

Categories: Construction, EDC, New Gear, New Work Tools, Remodeling, Work Tools, Work/Job

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