old tools

Holy Slip-It, Batman!

Anyone remember these things?

I don’t. Generally before my time I think. I’ve seen them for sale, once, a decade or so ago in the SMKW catalog. Had never seen them there before that, nor since. I’m told they wee common 30 to 40 years ago, or there abouts.

Huh? Oh, what is it, you say?

It’s a knife. Called a Slip-it.

Cool design, simple and cheap, usually given away as promotional/advertising freebies.

You pull up one end of the inner bar, the other end hinges on the tail of the blade. Then slide the blade out, and press the (now)flipped inner piece back down. Friction keeps it down in both open and closed positions.

This one came from a yard sale when I was a kid. I was 8 to 10, somewhere in there. I picked it up (closed) looked it over, didn’t know what it was, set if down.

Dad came along, picked it up, opened it, closed it, went hmm, and the lady running the sale said, oh, you can just have that.

I tried to connive that I’d seen it first, but neither one of them would go for it since I’d put it back… Hey, it was worth a try! πŸ˜‰ lol.

So, why the post, and the funky comic reference title?

The retractable 3/8″ blade on the mini utility knife I have been carrying is greag for a lot of things, but is really lacking in slitting letters open.

When I reached for a longer blade, I saw this little guy on the shelf, and a light bulb went on.

I’ve never used it much since its been mine(about 8 years). It’s cool, but it’s such a thin blade. Like really thin. Like utility knife thin. But utility knife blades are wider, shorter, and more stable. And disposable if you break it.

And let’s face it, as much as knives are not pry bars, even those of us that are extremely careful tend to have lateral pressure on a blade about 1 in every 5 cuts. Just how it is with a working blade!

I like and use small blades, but not this thin, while this long. Just don’t want to bend or snap the sucker off.

But as a household knife, I figured what risk is there? Opening mail, packaged foods, light crafts tasks like cutting twine or trimming leather is the hardest use it’d get.

And since this week I’d been carrying a household knife, as posted a couple days ago, I suddenly saw a use for this lil ole guy.

And the Holy part you ask?

Thats simple.

It should be spelled Holey or hole-y.

‘Cause I drilled a hole in it.

πŸ˜€

They don’t come with the split ring, or a place for one. For my current concept of home carry, it needed a bail/key ring/lanyard loop/whatever you want to call it.

Put it in the back end, where there was already a divot in the plastic. It looks like it was hot pressed there to keep the two handle halves together. Doesn’t seem to have loosened the parts any though.

How it spent the day, with its new friends, in my pocket;

Categories: Alaska-Life, Customized, Daily-cary-log, EDC, Home Life, key-chains, knives, Modifications, old tools, Pocket knives, Vintage | 2 Comments

The W Box.

An older project. I started this in the summer of 2018, for a friend’s birthday. His name starts with a W, thus our title above. πŸ™‚

He does electronics work, so when I found this old amp meter, in DC milliamperes, in some stuff that had been my Dads, it seemed perfect for a gift.

But i couldn’t just give a bare gauge…

Ok, I could have, but where’s the fun in that? πŸ˜‰

I missed the birthday.

And Christmas.

Managed to get it done and give it in the spring of 2019. Ha!

But anyway, here it is. Only the 3rd box I’ve ever built in my life. (So don’t judge me too harsly!)

Its white oak, and curly maple. It was entertaining to get it how I wanted it, rabbeted construction, a place to store the leads (plugs and leads stolen from an old multi meter I took apart), but still compact. Engineered and re-engineered seveeal times, but I got it!

I don’t really have all of the pics I could, no step by step.And no steps of progress like I’d like… Hust a mishmash of what I managed to take, and the final product.

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Categories: Christmas, Custom, Customized, Electronics/Media, Fabrication, Good Friends, Just Plain Fun, MacGyver, Modifications, old tools, Recycle, Scrounging, Sentimental, Woodshop, Woodwork

Un re-chambering a Winchester model 90

A bit of history;

This gun was, somewhat obviously, designed in 1890. For a while they were the model 1890, then they became the model 90. Originally chambered for .22L, .22Short and later the .22LR, and then .22 WRF.

They are THE original gallery guns, made famous in shooting galleries and fairs.

This one was made in 1932, and chambered in .22WRF

.22WRF was(is) a higher powered .22, more oomph than a .22 long or long rifle.

Later, the .22 WMR, know usually as .22 Mag was introduced. Very simply it is a WRF that’s been lengthened to hold more powder. Same as the way we got .357 Magnum from .38 Special.

Being bigger, it was more powerful. And popular. It in fact became so popular that the. 22 WRF became obsolete, after a while no longer chambered, and then ammunition stopped being made.

Around that time this gun was modified, to chamber, feed, and fire, the longer .22 WMR.

The only difference in all of these guns for different cartridges, is obviously the barrels chamber, and, as I found out, the carrier.

I had figured that since the shorter round would chamber, (like a 38 in a 357 chamber, the length difference is no problem at all) it would cycle the shorter rounds, and I could fire either round. Much the same as other .22 rifles that will cycle and fire .22 short, long and long rifle.

But “why?” I hear you ask, if the ammo isn’t made?

Well, actually Now, the ammo is made! Its been brought back, from popular demand, so that the older guns can be used!

And I’m glad for it! .22 WMR is a fine round for varmints, and predators. But I hunt neither, and its far too expensive for range/target use. Its too powerful for small game hunting, destroying far too much meat, in a messy fashion.

The .22 WRF on the other hand is light enough for small game hunting, but still a little more oomph than the common .22LR, for range, and bigger animals. Basically its a half step between .22LR and .22WMR.

Now, its not exactly cheap being a specialty ammo, but its about the same cost as most .22 WMR.

Still a little spendy for plinking wabbits, but then again, hunting with a 84 year old pump action is worth it!

Back to my problem;

The carrier is of a controlled feed design, meaning it fully controls the cartridge for its entire journey from magazine to chamber.

This is good, because it allows the gun to function in Any position. Even upside down! Try to do that with most bolt actions, or lever actions. πŸ˜‰

This is also bad, in our case because it makes the carier a much more exact fir to thr round it carries.

To do so, the cartridge doesn’t just sit on top of the carrier as in a lot of designs, but sits surounded by it. Thus the carrier has to have a channel for the cartridge that is the exact length.

This is important, because, as I found out, how far the round goes into the carrier determines if the next round leaves the magazine. The tip of the round is the cartridge stop while the carrier is down. After if starts up, another part holds the next round.

Whoever converted this gun, deepened the chamber in the barrel, And deepened the channel in the carrier.

Here is a .22 WMR, in this guns carrier.

Here is what happens if you load it with the shorter .22 WRF;

With one round already inside the carrier, what you’r seeing is thd next round un line, partially into the carrier, partially inside the magazine.

And at that poing the gun jams, since that second round holds the carrier from lifting.

Here it is from another view;

Its not a big difference in length, but its enough to cause a jam. WMR on top, WRF below.

So, what we need, is either the cartridge to be longer, so it holds the next round out of the carrier, or the carrier channel to be shallower, providing the same effect.

Here is the shorter WRF inserted just far enough to sit its tip where a WMR tip would be, to hold the next round foreward.

So, our solution, is this part here;

Shown with its retaining set screw.

Like most firearms modifications or repairs, it’s a very small, very simple part, and (relatively) easy to make.

Just needing made to Exacting specifications, thus it’s a deceptively simple little chunk of brass.

It was simple to make, but it wasn’t exactly “easy”. Nor was it quick to make or fit.

Here it is installed, and with its set screw hole drilled and tapped in the carrier itself.

And here you can see its very simple function; It holds the cartridge foreward to where the tip needs to sit, where a WMR tip would be, to keep the next round from feeding, and causing our jam. Simple!

It’s brass because its a low to zero wear part, and it’s an easy material to fit/work with. I could have used steel and heat treated it for wear, but its just not necessary, in my opinion.

It has a “C” shape, to allow a channel for the extractor to pass through, which is what pushes the cartridge forward for chambering. Matching the channel in the carrier itself.

And it works flawlessly! The gun now chambers and fires WRF ammunition again. The only thing I lost was the abillity to Also use WMR ammo. Its still a single cartridge gun. Snall loss, as I’ve explained, I have no real use for WMR.

Overall this was one of my simplest gun fixes. It was interesting to figure out, and tedious to make/fit the part, but was really rather simple, and very fun. Some fixes similar to this have required several days of welding up new steel onto a carrier or bolt, and grinding/filing/refitting it down to size, repeatedly, until it works.

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, A.I.O., Brass, Customized, Fabrication, Field gear, Guns, Gunsmithing, Hunting, Modifications, old tools, Repairs, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting, Winchesters

EDC Catch up, fall 2019

Well, here we go again, big dump of pics of pocket dumps from the last 3 or 4 months. Hope you enjoy!

Categories: Adventures, Alaska-Life, Daily-cary-log, EDC, EDC/MT use, Flashlights, Guns, Jewelry, knives, Lighters, Multitools, New Gear, old tools, Outdoors, Pocket knives, Watches, weather and seasons

Old Timer spa treatment.

Schrade USA Old Timer knives that is!

Have had both of these a while, the 8OT Stockman a couple years, and have carried it off and on. The 94OT Trapper almost as long, but hadn’t used it.

The Stockman came from a close friend, a knife he used to carry/use. We were cleaning out a tool box in one of his old trucks. The box had gotten full of water… Yup, knife was solid orange rust. He said if I thought I could do something with it I could have it.

90% of it was loose rust and came off in a WD-40 bath, I sharpened if and left it at that, and used it.

The trapper came from another friend, as I recall by way of a passaround box on a forum, was one he snagged at a flea market. It was badically clean, just hard rust in the joints and on the areas where the blades were exposed. I intended to give it a good cleaning, but it always got put on a back burner.

Anyway, time to kill, and lots of elbow grease, and I got them both cleaned up.

1st round is WD-40 and a cloth for any soft/new rust, and loose dirt.

2nd round is light oil on a Scotch Brite pad for blades and back of springs.

3rd round is Flitz polish on the scotch brite pad for blades, springs, and bolsters.

4th round is the Flitz on a soft cloth, for everything, delrin included.

Not perfect, and I wouldn’t want that. There is still some set-in hard rust, and some patina too. Shows they’ve had a life already, and an interesting one too.

Categories: Damages, EDC, Field gear, Good Friends, knives, old tools, Pocket knives, Repairs

I *Think*Β it’s time to re-blue my 30-06 barrel.

At the least, some serious touch ups are needed.  Dragging it through the brush the last several years has taken its toll… Not to mention it turned 49 years old this summer, I’m sure some of these scratches were there before it was mine.

 But I do see a lot more after every season, some distinctively new this last week.. 

Especially on the underside. –Which makes sense; when the gun is shoulder slung, that part of the barrel meets the brush I push through as it goes over/around me.

And Yes, those are rust spots in the first pic, and on the muzzle… Found out the hard way that my Kolpin gun boot IV is NOT waterproof if left upside down..  

The butt end cover fits Over the main part of the case, but without a seal. So left upside down in the rain on the boat for 5 days, water runs into the cap… And then into the rest of the case when you pick it up.

 Dumped probably a quart of water out of it… Foam liner was basically soaked. Found this when loading the boat to come home  –no time to dry it.

–In defense of the case, it is designed to be solid mounted in a vehicle,  butt up, barrel down, cap up, “right side up”, so water couldn’t enter in this manner.  Ive been using it as a hard carry case off of a mount, Not what it was designed for.

About the only way you’d get water in it when mounted upright is full submersion… which its not designed for either..    Definitely operator error leaving it upside down in the rain a few days, Not a fault of the case or its design.

No other easy way to carry the rifle home though, to keep it out of the way anyway, and out of the rain. Had to put it in the wet case.  15 hours later when I got home, the rifle was pretty wet.. Wiped it down then, but it still managed to rust a few spots before I got it cleaned(couple days later).

Gave it a thorough WD-40 bath… Really slathered it on, whole action out of the stock, and the bore. Wiped down again. 

Then did a simple bore cleaning, solvent, brush, patches.. There is some somewhat heavy copper fouling in the bore, that  wouldn’t budge… Didnt want to scrub it THAT hard now, but if any of it was rust, I did brush it hard enough, I’m sure it would have come out.   Then oiled the snot out of it inside and out…

Did the 357 while I was at it… been meaning to clean and oil that gun for months, its spent a lot of time out in the weather this year, and it’s missing a lot more of its blueing. Actually amazes me that that gun never shows any rust inside or out..

Hate to admit it, but this is the cleanest they’ve both been for a couple years…

Honestly, I don’t clean guns often, if they shoot and function good, and ain’t rusting, all I do is oil from time to time.

  Do Need to get in a better habit though of post trip cleaning! At least for surface moisture/external dirt and grime if not full on scrubbing..

Categories: Adventures, ATV Accessories, Damages, Guns, Gunsmithing, Hunting, old tools, Outdoors, Woods tools

Schrade Dogleg Trapper

Mail call yesterday,  a surprise gift from a friend! Great old Schrade USA dogleg trapper in really good shape! Little rust on the blades,  but nothing broke or excessively worn, someone took good care of this one for a while. 

 I’m usually not a trapper fan, but this one is nice, it’s only 3-7/8″, 1/4″ shorter than the norm, and has a much more pronounced curve in the frame shape– I like it! 

Will give it a spa treatment today, and drop it into cary rotation. 

Categories: EDC, knives, New Gear, old tools, Pocket knives, Sentimental

Exercise, Β not as intended.

Needed some bolts for upcoming projects, my hardware bins are getting kinda sparse. So I took the free bow flex I hauled home last year the rest of the way apart.

Pretty good haul of steel stock, cables, and hardware! Some pieces of steel, and cables I’ve had plans for, for a while. The rest I’m sure I’ll find uses for soon. 
#freesteel #freehardware #scrounger #McGyver #fabrication 

Categories: Fabrication, Improviser, MacGyver, Materials, old tools, Scrounging, Welding

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