Modifications

A Sunday EDC, after 5 years.

Was looking through some old pics of mine, and realized that May of 2015 and 2020 are identical for dates/day of week.

The 17th was a Sunday in both years.
So, Sunday carry Exactly 5 years apart;

’15;

[IMG]

This would be one of my last pocket dumps with the flip phone, since within the month, and as I recall not long after my birthday, I went and got the Galaxy S5.

Also one of my last photos taken with a “real” camera, not a phone.

Looks like no watch since I think I had converted that pocket watch to a pill case by then, but maybe not. Nook as E-Bible.

No ring since that fall is when I made my moonglow and acrylic rings.

Didn’t start carrying hanks till the next year I think, or at least winter of 15/16.

IIRC I hadn’t started consistent Sunday CCW then.

Before I started color coordinating.

’20;

[IMG]

This one is a bit odd, since this last year I had started a distinctively lighter/minimal carry for Sundays… Which this isn’t. Its kinda 1/2 and half.

This sunday was the first church since Convid19/pandemic/shutdown. (Alaska is now on “reopen” orders, with gatherings, events etc allowed again.) I couldnt find my go to church bible, so used my phone. Phone is now an S8 as of this month so these pics skip the S5 entirely, even though it lasted almost the entire 5 years.

No notebook or pen since I stopped them a couple months ago. Haven’t worn my dog tags for a while either since weekdays I have the neck knife.

Metal ring I made before or ironically in 2015(from an AK quarter), since I have recently broke the acrylics.

New watch, and a general blue theme which matched my wardrobe for the day, blue denim, T and Hawaii-ish/islands shirt.

Haven’t used the buffalo money clip for about a year, although I still have it. Got these light weight card case wallets especially for light church carry, and they became every day use.

Same style of knife, traditional. One a stockman, one a muskrat which is a stockman frame.

Same exact flashlight, and the multitool too!

Categories: Alaska-Life, Daily-cary-log, EDC, EDC/MT use, Flashlights, Good Times, Journal, Just Plain Fun, Life-Philosophy, Modifications, Pocket knives, Sentimental, Summertime, Theory/Thoughts | 1 Comment

Holy Slip-It, Batman!

Anyone remember these things?

I don’t. Generally before my time I think. I’ve seen them for sale, once, a decade or so ago in the SMKW catalog. Had never seen them there before that, nor since. I’m told they wee common 30 to 40 years ago, or there abouts.

Huh? Oh, what is it, you say?

It’s a knife. Called a Slip-it.

Cool design, simple and cheap, usually given away as promotional/advertising freebies.

You pull up one end of the inner bar, the other end hinges on the tail of the blade. Then slide the blade out, and press the (now)flipped inner piece back down. Friction keeps it down in both open and closed positions.

This one came from a yard sale when I was a kid. I was 8 to 10, somewhere in there. I picked it up (closed) looked it over, didn’t know what it was, set if down.

Dad came along, picked it up, opened it, closed it, went hmm, and the lady running the sale said, oh, you can just have that.

I tried to connive that I’d seen it first, but neither one of them would go for it since I’d put it back… Hey, it was worth a try! ๐Ÿ˜‰ lol.

So, why the post, and the funky comic reference title?

The retractable 3/8″ blade on the mini utility knife I have been carrying is greag for a lot of things, but is really lacking in slitting letters open.

When I reached for a longer blade, I saw this little guy on the shelf, and a light bulb went on.

I’ve never used it much since its been mine(about 8 years). It’s cool, but it’s such a thin blade. Like really thin. Like utility knife thin. But utility knife blades are wider, shorter, and more stable. And disposable if you break it.

And let’s face it, as much as knives are not pry bars, even those of us that are extremely careful tend to have lateral pressure on a blade about 1 in every 5 cuts. Just how it is with a working blade!

I like and use small blades, but not this thin, while this long. Just don’t want to bend or snap the sucker off.

But as a household knife, I figured what risk is there? Opening mail, packaged foods, light crafts tasks like cutting twine or trimming leather is the hardest use it’d get.

And since this week I’d been carrying a household knife, as posted a couple days ago, I suddenly saw a use for this lil ole guy.

And the Holy part you ask?

Thats simple.

It should be spelled Holey or hole-y.

‘Cause I drilled a hole in it.

๐Ÿ˜€

They don’t come with the split ring, or a place for one. For my current concept of home carry, it needed a bail/key ring/lanyard loop/whatever you want to call it.

Put it in the back end, where there was already a divot in the plastic. It looks like it was hot pressed there to keep the two handle halves together. Doesn’t seem to have loosened the parts any though.

How it spent the day, with its new friends, in my pocket;

Categories: Alaska-Life, Customized, Daily-cary-log, EDC, Home Life, key-chains, knives, Modifications, old tools, Pocket knives, Vintage

Same moose, different antlers?

So…. is it bad that I had it 3 days, carrying it 2 days, and already modded it? Lol..
Thats better!


But then, I knew I would when I bought it. my usual, favorite blade preferences, applied to my favorite blade arrangement. (Yeah, you should have seen this coming when I first posted the knife!)

Clip into sheeps foot, clipped shorter and narrowed, then re-edged. Also dropped the kick, to sit lower in the frame when closed, as far as I could.

The spey I made into a clip/skinner, taking some of the swedge out, and removing the raised tip.

With its bigger cousin, the same mods on a Case Muskrat. The moose isn’t actually any narrower, and its thicker. But is shorter.

Its enough of a difference though, its smaller in pocket, which was what I was after in a mini muskrat/moose frame. But it still grips nice in hand, a great bonus.

๐Ÿ˜€

Categories: Custom, Customized, Daily-cary-log, EDC, Field gear, knives, Modifications, New Gear, Pocket knives

Multiple tools use?

A friend on an EDC forum asked me an interesting question today;

Hey AK-A, You’ve had that Victorinox Swiss Tool Spirit for quite some time.
Which three of its tools have you used the most? TIA

It’s funny that he should ask me that; A couple nights before when putting things up for the night, I was looking at it and thinking about what I use and don’t use.

My answer is as follows;
Top 2 are easy, pliers, phillips driver, in that order.

But I had to add a footnote, that I’m not sure that #2 counts as Vic specific since I hated the Vic driver. I cut it off and welded a Leatherman flat style 1/4″ bit holder onto it several years ago. ๐Ÿ™‚
#3 is hard to tell what I use more, but I *think* its the large flat head driver/bottle opener as leverage/a pry bar.

Honorable mention/#4, #5 goes to the other two that tied with that big driver, the awl and the wire cutters.


Use the awl as a pick, scraper, small pry tool a lot. And the wire cutters get alot of use when I’m running the wire feed welder.
Honestly, out of those last three its really, really, really hard to tell what I use more.
I can tell you what I Never use; the knife blade.

I started out hating the style(which is ironically now my favorite to use on any other knife, a sheepsfoot), and now I just prefer the ergonomics of a dedicated pocket knife.
Rarely, almost never used, is the chisel/scraper. Like maybe 15 times in the ~12 years I’ve had the tool.

That thing I’d probably use more if I remembered it was there… for some reason, maybe because I carried a Leatherman for so long and they don’t have one, I never think of it being there.

I tend to see it when opening another tool and think “dang that woulda been handy 10 minutes ago…”

Categories: Daily-cary-log, EDC, EDC/MT use, Field gear, Improviser, Journal, MacGyver, Modifications, Multitools, Preparedness, Reviews, SAKs, Theory/Thoughts, Usage Reviews

The W Box.

An older project. I started this in the summer of 2018, for a friend’s birthday. His name starts with a W, thus our title above. ๐Ÿ™‚

He does electronics work, so when I found this old amp meter, in DC milliamperes, in some stuff that had been my Dads, it seemed perfect for a gift.

But i couldn’t just give a bare gauge…

Ok, I could have, but where’s the fun in that? ๐Ÿ˜‰

I missed the birthday.

And Christmas.

Managed to get it done and give it in the spring of 2019. Ha!

But anyway, here it is. Only the 3rd box I’ve ever built in my life. (So don’t judge me too harsly!)

Its white oak, and curly maple. It was entertaining to get it how I wanted it, rabbeted construction, a place to store the leads (plugs and leads stolen from an old multi meter I took apart), but still compact. Engineered and re-engineered seveeal times, but I got it!

I don’t really have all of the pics I could, no step by step.And no steps of progress like I’d like… Hust a mishmash of what I managed to take, and the final product.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Categories: Christmas, Custom, Customized, Electronics/Media, Fabrication, Good Friends, Just Plain Fun, MacGyver, Modifications, old tools, Recycle, Scrounging, Sentimental, Woodshop, Woodwork

Un re-chambering a Winchester model 90

A bit of history;

This gun was, somewhat obviously, designed in 1890. For a while they were the model 1890, then they became the model 90. Originally chambered for .22L, .22Short and later the .22LR, and then .22 WRF.

They are THE original gallery guns, made famous in shooting galleries and fairs.

This one was made in 1932, and chambered in .22WRF

.22WRF was(is) a higher powered .22, more oomph than a .22 long or long rifle.

Later, the .22 WMR, know usually as .22 Mag was introduced. Very simply it is a WRF that’s been lengthened to hold more powder. Same as the way we got .357 Magnum from .38 Special.

Being bigger, it was more powerful. And popular. It in fact became so popular that the. 22 WRF became obsolete, after a while no longer chambered, and then ammunition stopped being made.

Around that time this gun was modified, to chamber, feed, and fire, the longer .22 WMR.

The only difference in all of these guns for different cartridges, is obviously the barrels chamber, and, as I found out, the carrier.

I had figured that since the shorter round would chamber, (like a 38 in a 357 chamber, the length difference is no problem at all) it would cycle the shorter rounds, and I could fire either round. Much the same as other .22 rifles that will cycle and fire .22 short, long and long rifle.

But “why?” I hear you ask, if the ammo isn’t made?

Well, actually Now, the ammo is made! Its been brought back, from popular demand, so that the older guns can be used!

And I’m glad for it! .22 WMR is a fine round for varmints, and predators. But I hunt neither, and its far too expensive for range/target use. Its too powerful for small game hunting, destroying far too much meat, in a messy fashion.

The .22 WRF on the other hand is light enough for small game hunting, but still a little more oomph than the common .22LR, for range, and bigger animals. Basically its a half step between .22LR and .22WMR.

Now, its not exactly cheap being a specialty ammo, but its about the same cost as most .22 WMR.

Still a little spendy for plinking wabbits, but then again, hunting with a 84 year old pump action is worth it!

Back to my problem;

The carrier is of a controlled feed design, meaning it fully controls the cartridge for its entire journey from magazine to chamber.

This is good, because it allows the gun to function in Any position. Even upside down! Try to do that with most bolt actions, or lever actions. ๐Ÿ˜‰

This is also bad, in our case because it makes the carier a much more exact fir to thr round it carries.

To do so, the cartridge doesn’t just sit on top of the carrier as in a lot of designs, but sits surounded by it. Thus the carrier has to have a channel for the cartridge that is the exact length.

This is important, because, as I found out, how far the round goes into the carrier determines if the next round leaves the magazine. The tip of the round is the cartridge stop while the carrier is down. After if starts up, another part holds the next round.

Whoever converted this gun, deepened the chamber in the barrel, And deepened the channel in the carrier.

Here is a .22 WMR, in this guns carrier.

Here is what happens if you load it with the shorter .22 WRF;

With one round already inside the carrier, what you’r seeing is thd next round un line, partially into the carrier, partially inside the magazine.

And at that poing the gun jams, since that second round holds the carrier from lifting.

Here it is from another view;

Its not a big difference in length, but its enough to cause a jam. WMR on top, WRF below.

So, what we need, is either the cartridge to be longer, so it holds the next round out of the carrier, or the carrier channel to be shallower, providing the same effect.

Here is the shorter WRF inserted just far enough to sit its tip where a WMR tip would be, to hold the next round foreward.

So, our solution, is this part here;

Shown with its retaining set screw.

Like most firearms modifications or repairs, it’s a very small, very simple part, and (relatively) easy to make.

Just needing made to Exacting specifications, thus it’s a deceptively simple little chunk of brass.

It was simple to make, but it wasn’t exactly “easy”. Nor was it quick to make or fit.

Here it is installed, and with its set screw hole drilled and tapped in the carrier itself.

And here you can see its very simple function; It holds the cartridge foreward to where the tip needs to sit, where a WMR tip would be, to keep the next round from feeding, and causing our jam. Simple!

It’s brass because its a low to zero wear part, and it’s an easy material to fit/work with. I could have used steel and heat treated it for wear, but its just not necessary, in my opinion.

It has a “C” shape, to allow a channel for the extractor to pass through, which is what pushes the cartridge forward for chambering. Matching the channel in the carrier itself.

And it works flawlessly! The gun now chambers and fires WRF ammunition again. The only thing I lost was the abillity to Also use WMR ammo. Its still a single cartridge gun. Snall loss, as I’ve explained, I have no real use for WMR.

Overall this was one of my simplest gun fixes. It was interesting to figure out, and tedious to make/fit the part, but was really rather simple, and very fun. Some fixes similar to this have required several days of welding up new steel onto a carrier or bolt, and grinding/filing/refitting it down to size, repeatedly, until it works.

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, A.I.O., Brass, Customized, Fabrication, Field gear, Guns, Gunsmithing, Hunting, Modifications, old tools, Repairs, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting, Winchesters

Gloving around again.

Part two, or, darn those gloves! ๐Ÿ˜‰

Parg one was here;

https://ak-adventurer.net/2019/10/13/darning-leather-gloves/

Have a pair of nice heavy deer skin work gloves that I wore almost all summer. They started developing holes about a month and a half ago.

*snip*

theyโ€™re broken in, already stainedโ€“ donโ€™t have to worry what I get on them, they fit me, and are comfortable as all get out nowโ€ฆ Iโ€™ve been missing them!

With socks its called darning. Maybe only on knit socks. Ive been saying Iโ€™m darning gloves. But theyโ€™re not knit, and darning might not apply even to knit glovesโ€ฆ lol.

*snip*

But at any rate, Iโ€™m enjoying it, it improves my sewing, saves some gloves, and fills some time.

I still have one big hole and one small one to patch, and two seams to re-close.

So, thus, onto the finish!

One more finger tip done;

And a thumb;

Not perfect by any means, but I think they’ll last a while again. A bonus, I’m getting better, and faster at the sewing!

I switched to a skin needle– its a cutting needle, a triangular cross section and sharp edges. Goes through the glove leather easier.

I also changed to a smaller, but stronger thread, that’s easier to sew with.

What I had before is a heavy waxed braided cotton that’s sold for leather work.

What I changed to is a braided synthetic fishing line. Designed for ice fishing, it has a high abrasion resistance, and is s 20# test. It looks likd a super fine and weak thread, but is some tough stuff! Should last a while anyway.

So there we have it. probably an hours work that took me a couple weeks.

They’re not perfect. One finger got shorter because I over trimmed. One got longer from over compensation for the previous over trimming. The last thumb I did stayed in length but got narrower/tighter,

Hahaha, Just can’t win, eh? ๐Ÿ˜‰

but I have my gloves back!

Categories: Clothes, Cowboy, Damages, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Gloves, Leather, Modifications, Preparedness, Repairs, Sewing, Soft Goods

Time for a fix; or fixing time?

Haven’t been able to wear my Eco-Drive chrony for a while, after I found a problem with the band.

Wore through around the under straps keeper ring. (Strap is a leather NATO style)

Technically the watch is still secured by the top strap, but I wasn’t comfortable wearing it til I got it fixed.

Took a couple months to get to where, today, I had time/wanted it enough to actually do something about it.

Some of the rest of the band is also a little rough, here is where its worn through on the bottom strap next to the spot I’m fixing. But its only through the one layer, it’ll be fine for a while though, I think.

I simply stitched the bottom strap to the top one, and trimmed off the worn loop where the ring sat.

From the back;

Got a little too far from the edge there on one side, but it works. ๐Ÿ™‚

Side that shows;

Easy fix and all I lost at this point, is that it isn’t an easy change band anymore. I’ll have to pull the spring bars to take the watch off. No big loss really though; Except for about 2 weeks when it was new, the watch has been on this band since about this time of year in 2011. ๐Ÿ˜€

Categories: Damages, EDC, Leather, Modifications, Repairs, Sentimental, Soft Goods, Watches

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