Hunting

Un re-chambering a Winchester model 90

A bit of history;

This gun was, somewhat obviously, designed in 1890. For a while they were the model 1890, then they became the model 90. Originally chambered for .22L, .22Short and later the .22LR, and then .22 WRF.

They are THE original gallery guns, made famous in shooting galleries and fairs.

This one was made in 1932, and chambered in .22WRF

.22WRF was(is) a higher powered .22, more oomph than a .22 long or long rifle.

Later, the .22 WMR, know usually as .22 Mag was introduced. Very simply it is a WRF that’s been lengthened to hold more powder. Same as the way we got .357 Magnum from .38 Special.

Being bigger, it was more powerful. And popular. It in fact became so popular that the. 22 WRF became obsolete, after a while no longer chambered, and then ammunition stopped being made.

Around that time this gun was modified, to chamber, feed, and fire, the longer .22 WMR.

The only difference in all of these guns for different cartridges, is obviously the barrels chamber, and, as I found out, the carrier.

I had figured that since the shorter round would chamber, (like a 38 in a 357 chamber, the length difference is no problem at all) it would cycle the shorter rounds, and I could fire either round. Much the same as other .22 rifles that will cycle and fire .22 short, long and long rifle.

But “why?” I hear you ask, if the ammo isn’t made?

Well, actually Now, the ammo is made! Its been brought back, from popular demand, so that the older guns can be used!

And I’m glad for it! .22 WMR is a fine round for varmints, and predators. But I hunt neither, and its far too expensive for range/target use. Its too powerful for small game hunting, destroying far too much meat, in a messy fashion.

The .22 WRF on the other hand is light enough for small game hunting, but still a little more oomph than the common .22LR, for range, and bigger animals. Basically its a half step between .22LR and .22WMR.

Now, its not exactly cheap being a specialty ammo, but its about the same cost as most .22 WMR.

Still a little spendy for plinking wabbits, but then again, hunting with a 84 year old pump action is worth it!

Back to my problem;

The carrier is of a controlled feed design, meaning it fully controls the cartridge for its entire journey from magazine to chamber.

This is good, because it allows the gun to function in Any position. Even upside down! Try to do that with most bolt actions, or lever actions. 😉

This is also bad, in our case because it makes the carier a much more exact fir to thr round it carries.

To do so, the cartridge doesn’t just sit on top of the carrier as in a lot of designs, but sits surounded by it. Thus the carrier has to have a channel for the cartridge that is the exact length.

This is important, because, as I found out, how far the round goes into the carrier determines if the next round leaves the magazine. The tip of the round is the cartridge stop while the carrier is down. After if starts up, another part holds the next round.

Whoever converted this gun, deepened the chamber in the barrel, And deepened the channel in the carrier.

Here is a .22 WMR, in this guns carrier.

Here is what happens if you load it with the shorter .22 WRF;

With one round already inside the carrier, what you’r seeing is thd next round un line, partially into the carrier, partially inside the magazine.

And at that poing the gun jams, since that second round holds the carrier from lifting.

Here it is from another view;

Its not a big difference in length, but its enough to cause a jam. WMR on top, WRF below.

So, what we need, is either the cartridge to be longer, so it holds the next round out of the carrier, or the carrier channel to be shallower, providing the same effect.

Here is the shorter WRF inserted just far enough to sit its tip where a WMR tip would be, to hold the next round foreward.

So, our solution, is this part here;

Shown with its retaining set screw.

Like most firearms modifications or repairs, it’s a very small, very simple part, and (relatively) easy to make.

Just needing made to Exacting specifications, thus it’s a deceptively simple little chunk of brass.

It was simple to make, but it wasn’t exactly “easy”. Nor was it quick to make or fit.

Here it is installed, and with its set screw hole drilled and tapped in the carrier itself.

And here you can see its very simple function; It holds the cartridge foreward to where the tip needs to sit, where a WMR tip would be, to keep the next round from feeding, and causing our jam. Simple!

It’s brass because its a low to zero wear part, and it’s an easy material to fit/work with. I could have used steel and heat treated it for wear, but its just not necessary, in my opinion.

It has a “C” shape, to allow a channel for the extractor to pass through, which is what pushes the cartridge forward for chambering. Matching the channel in the carrier itself.

And it works flawlessly! The gun now chambers and fires WRF ammunition again. The only thing I lost was the abillity to Also use WMR ammo. Its still a single cartridge gun. Snall loss, as I’ve explained, I have no real use for WMR.

Overall this was one of my simplest gun fixes. It was interesting to figure out, and tedious to make/fit the part, but was really rather simple, and very fun. Some fixes similar to this have required several days of welding up new steel onto a carrier or bolt, and grinding/filing/refitting it down to size, repeatedly, until it works.

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, A.I.O., Brass, Customized, Fabrication, Field gear, Guns, Gunsmithing, Hunting, Modifications, old tools, Repairs, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting, Winchesters | Leave a comment

Guns, woods, birds, bunnies.

Just a little set of pictures from a day out this week.

Remnants of a light snow we had meaning the grouse would be easier to see, and 45F degree weather, promted me to got hunting for a little while.

Lots of bunny sign, tracks, and trails. Lots of fox tracks, and I’d guess what was a lynx track too.

Saw one bunny, too late, as he bounded ouf of range into deep thick cover.

Later I saw one grouse too, and had a couple good shots open but by that time it was getting late, and I was on my way home, my heart wasnt really in it then.

I completed the stalk to where I could have taken it, but decided not to. At that poing the opportunity was enough. 🙂

Overall unproductive, but it was a grwat couplr hours out and about anyway!

Categories: 22 guns, Adventures, Alaska-Life, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Good Times, Guns, Hunting, Just Plain Fun, Life-Philosophy, Outdoors, Rimfire, weather and seasons, Wildlife | 1 Comment

A rare sharp.

Dug this one out mid last week.

Don’t carry it much any more, for fear of losing it… Hate that I do that though so I got it out. Pretty unique knife, a little ironically because it’s just a cheap Rough Rider.. You have to go back to Schrade in the 60s and 70s to get another one of thus pattern in this size.
Modern copperhead pattern is close but not the same, this is a true folding hunter, scaled to 4″ overall closed. Love it! Perfect size for the pattern IMNSHO, wanted one ever since I’d seen the Schrade, so I jumped on this one when I saw it…. Eeeek, gotta be 9 or 10 years ago now.
I’ve never been able to find another one either! Even at the time I got it, it was the only Rough Rider like it I could find.

Categories: EDC, Hunting, knives

Do take heed of low velocity warnings!

So… when you read or hear warnings about low power ammo and long barrels… Heed them!

Been playing around with some .22 Aguila Super Colibri, which are a 20 grain bullet over no powder; primer only. Supposedly a 550 fps muzzle velocity… Out of what I’m not sure. I’ve read they’re designed for use in pistols(revolvers, it would never cycle a semiautomatic) only.

I like them because they’re so quiet. Even out of my 4″ Bearcat the report is a mild pop, barely a sharp crack to it. No hearing protection needed, and you’ll never annoy a neighbor with them.

Figured what the hell I’d try them in my 1953 Marlin 39A (only non semi auto .22LR rifle I have). Bonus is they are shorter than the length of a standard 22LR; I can get 22 of them in the gun!

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Left to right; Standard Federal LR, Remington Shorts, and Aguila Super Colibri.

Down side is that this rifle is old school, and has a full 24″ barrel.

Every inch counts when your building velocity, I was betting they’d be faster than 550 out of a rifle length. But every inch is against you on low power rounds.

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That’s the tip of the bullet that’s stuck in the tip of the barrel!

That was the first round I fired. Popped it out with a cleaning rod.

Then I reloaded. 🙂 :D

The next 21 rounds all fired and cleared the barrel fine. The first one was the lower one in standard velocity spreads? Bore fouling? Weak primer? A fluke? Who knows.

They’re accurate and fun at backyard range, but you better be damn sure you can see or hear them hit something! There is no recoil and basically no report, the hammer fall click is louder!

If I get some time to get it out I’ll fire a few over the chronograph.

And yes, in case your wondering, these are “Super” Colibri… There is a standard non super version, same bullet, at a little over 100 fps slower! If I get any of those, I definitely Won’t be trying them in long barrels!

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, GetOutdoors, Guns, Hunting, Marlin, Outdoors, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting

New, cheap day packs.

I needed…

wanted…

uhhm…. yeah 😉

Lets say, saw a need for 😉 a couple light packs, to fill out gaps in capacity capabilities for day bags.

My main and favorite grab and go day bag for several years now has been a Black Diamond 16L pack. Its small, light, durrable, and can really be stuffed with day trip/hike essentials.

But it’s on the smaller side at times. Two years ago I acquired a 25L TNF (The North Face) Vault as an upgrade for those times.

It has the room I need on average, for day trips. But it has two problems; it has a stiff structured back panel that is a great idea, but horrendously uncomfortable.

And it’s bright red.

No matter what they say animals can and can’t see, I see little to no way of proving it… So I have a hard time taking bright colors on hunting trips.

On the other hand I find camo pointless, but thats another topic for another time. 🙂

So, I wanted another mid sized 25L to 35L pack for day hikes and day hunts, that wasn’t brightly colored.

And I also wanted a pack between that size, and the big 65L 3 day trip pack I have. An overnight day trip bag that wouldn’t be heavy or waste space. Mainly for my summer weight camping gear, where I don’t need the room for my 20° bag or many, if any extra clothes. Went with 45L.

I ended up with a claimed 35L that I’d say is around 20L maybe 25L actual capacity. And the other, claimed to be 45L, around 30L, 35L absolute max.

Not optimal. But then, for $10, and $15, shipped, respectively the small and large, I can’t complain much. 😉

It was worth the risk, and while not exactly what I needed, they’ll help out. I’ll just still need to find something in the 40L to 45L area for a summer time overnight trip bag.

For the smaller, I went with green, so I’m comfortable with it for hunting trips.

Draw closure top, with top flap. Pocket under flap.

And one ob the top of the flap;

Standard stretchy side pockets;

The outer sleeve pocket on the frontvis the same stretchy material.

Nice straps;

Grab handle leaves a little to be desired;

And, the nifty feature I liked, the inner pocket on the top flap is double zippered;

Turn the pocket insige out, roll the bag into it and zip;

Will make neatly packing it in my main hunting trip bag/dry bag much easier!

Overall it seems well built, and while light weight materials , also seems like it will be durable enough. Time will tell.

For the other, since it was planned as a non hunting hike pack, color didn’t matter much. So I went with something I liked, and something I’m garranteed to not lose when I set it down.

So sue me, I like purple. 🙂

It is 2 main compartments, small side mesh pockets, and a tiny zipped one on the front. And a bottom access area, that when fully opened/pressed out to capacity almost fills the whole main compartment! Bottom easy access for sleeping bag? Or ive seen the same made for shoes.. I’m sure ill find a use, but its a little odd in its size.

Chosen for it’s everal cord locked bungee attachment points, compression straps, and bottom straps that I liked the look of for hanging my tent on.

This one is heavier materials than the other, has a more solid feel to it.

I want to say it feels more solidly built as well, but that might be an illusion of the heavier materials. As I said above, only time will tell how they survive, but I’m thinking theyll be fine. 😉

Great wide padded straps;

Hip belt comes mid gut on me, like most do and is deathly short… I’ll probably cut it off. Nice adjustable/removable sternum strap though!

And I was pleasantly surprised by this;

First time I’ve ever seen a heavy dedicated carry handle on a backpack! And it still has the usual carry/hanging loop too.

Overall, I’m pleased for $25 total. Hell, I think I’d have been pleased with just the purple one for that much, or a little more. 🙂

Categories: Backpacks, Camping, Camping gear, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Hiking, Hunting, New Gear, Outdoors

An Axe Man’s Bucksaw Part 1

This obe is otherwise known as The Moon Saw. That name to be explained later though. 🙂

I’ve been wanting to do this project for a couple months now. Took a while to get other things out of the way… Pressing household maintenance like broken water tanks, and no running water kept cropping up! (Among other little things that Eat time).

I knew I wanted to do a 24″ saw, so I went and picked up a blade early last month. I actually got a whole swede saw. A blade was $8. A Fiskars saw with the blade was $11. Yeah, might as well buy the $3 saw with it, and have it!

Then it took a month for me to get time, and some shop space made to do it.

I neded some large paper for patterning another project, so I sat down and started drawing designs. I could have gone with dead simple straight side/handle bars, and been a LOT simpler and easier…

Bug I figured if I was going to do it, I might as well do what I liked.

The one I built is actually the second design I had drawn, and while the other was thought out over 3 days, this one I drew and finalized in 10 minutes. And liked it more!

(Original design on left, axe style on right)

You can see where the name comes from, if you notice the fawns foot handle ends, and “S” shapes. I had my hatchet handle on the bench at the time, and was holding it, such a nice grip; So I traced it, reversed it, traced again, and blended the contours some.

Simple!

More to be seen soon.

Categories: Adventure Metal Works, Axes, Backcountry, Camping gear, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Hunting, New Gear, Outdoors, wood processing, Woods tools, Woodshop, Woodwork

Field Holster; chest carry. 

I’d decided that I need a new holster for my .357. (Vintage Ruger Security Six, 4″). Field holster I guess you’d say… I don’t concealed carry often anymore, just open carry for hunting/hiking. 


Until recently I’ve done belt carry, have a great pancake holster from Simply Rugged that works phenominally. 

But I can’t do belt carry anymore;
Problem #1, it kills my screwed up hips, and #2 at current weight loss level/clothing sizing, keeping my pants up is impossible with the weight of a gun…Hell, it’s hard enough without the gun. Lol. (belt tight enough to hold it all up, cuts into back/hips too much, back to problem #1)

I’ve tried regular shoulder holsters. No go. Got a leather Galco “miami classic” style for a full size auto, have had it a decade, worn it a total of maybe ten times. 

Borrowed a buddies Uncle Mikes vertical nylon job for hunting last month. Wore it once. Rode ok once adjusted, but where it was secure and somewhat comfortable, I couldn’t reach the gun to draw it! 

I’ve had nylon ones twice in the past before. Got a great vintage Bianchi leather job that a good friend gave me, but it’s too big for this gun(actually hoping to convert it to chest or bandoleer carry for my .41 mag Blackhawk ). 

Anyway, I can Never get any slight semblance of comfortable, or secure, at the same time, and never an easy draw either way… 

Add to that the layers of straps you get with the holster, a backpack, and a rifle sling while out and about in the woods… Just no. There’s too much of the world sitting on my shoulders anyway, don’t need to add more! ;)

I’ve thought about a bandoleer setup, but that ends up on the hip cross draw… hard to reach (yes, I still have a bit of a spare tire to reach around, and add a heavy jacket, forget it!) and in a place that would interfere with backpacks, pack frames, and I think a slung rifle.. 

So, my last ditch idea is to attempt to try a chest rig… 

They’re actually extremely popular up here in AK for bear country fishing, and some hunting. 

Yes it hangs on shoulder straps, at least one..but the weight sits on the chest, not under the armpits. And it should pull on the back more than straight down on the shoulders.. I think. I’m thinking it will be more secure feeling and more accessible. And probably more comfortable, leave me some range of arm movement without under arm binding. (Hopefully!)  

So, a couple weeks digging around, and some fantastic suggestions from friends on a forum, and I made a choice. 

I ordered a holster last week. I’d seen these before, and looked at them off and on, but wasn’t sure.

But I decided for the cost –About $40– I couldn’t really go wrong.. If nothing else I could modify the snot out of it. ;)

But really, I decided I needed something low cost to try, to see if chest carry was even the answer, without dropping $70 to $150 depending. Expensive risk, if it turned out chest carry wasn’t my thing.

So, the make is Skyball Mountain Holsters. Amazingly, made in USA. Only places I can find them are Facebook and Ebay, apparently it’s a small business, no dedicated website.

I dug around and found out that the current Ruger GP100 is super close in size to a Security Six, so I ordered the one for a 4″ barrel GP100.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/262234099076

It fits the gun perfectly! 
(Being a open non formed holster, it actually fits All of my mid frame ~4″ hand guns almost perfectly!)

These are built a little different than the average chest harness. The average seems to be an around the body horizontal strap, then the holster sits on that or straps down to it. Then the shoulder strap goes over and attaches to the horizontal strap on your back.

This one is the horizontal strap, and then the shoulder strap goes around from the holster, and BACK TO the holster…

It works. But it adds another strap crossing under your arm, and for me it’s a bit uncomfortable crossing that high under my arm. (I’ve a bit of fat there and it presses in anoyingly)

But even having said that, this thing is SUPER comfortable!! 

I threw it on with the 357 over a light hoodie a few nights ago, and went out and split a days worth of firewood. 45 minutes swinging a splitting maul, lifting, moving logs, etc. and I only had to reposition it a few times. That’s pretty upper body active, more so than any average time I’d normally be wearing a gun.


My only little problem is the way it sits, all the tension is pulling to the left side… The straps don’t hold it to the right if it’s pulled left. But it’s a left hand draw. So it drifts left during draw. Grabbing it with the right hand durring draw fixes it obviously. But I might not always have that hand free, so it needs a hold down strap on the right.

There is a loop on the barrel end of the holster (probably for a hold down), so adding a short cord, I’m thinking shock cord for a little movement, should be easy, run down to my belt.

One other thing, not really a problem, is the chest strap, on me, is extended almost all the way out. Not a design flaw, I’m just a big guy. So I’ll have to get an extension strap for wearing it over a heavy coat. It’s all 1″ strap, and all ends are held with SRBs, so it’ll be easy/cheap to add/remove as needed. The shoulder strap on the other hand, oddly has like another 10″ of outward adjustment, it’ll be fine.

Overall, I really like it. It works, and is verry comfortable. 


As to mods, I’m trying to find the site I saw a T shaped side release buckle on recently… 

It was simple the male or female side of the buckle, but the strap side had the slots on it at a 90 to the buckle… So you can slide it to any place on a strap and have the buckle T off. It was for camping/hiking packs, like to add a sternum strap or similar. Just can’t find it again! 

Anyway, was thinking one of those or similar on the around the chest strap, put it in the back, and clip the shoulder strap into it, doing away with the under arm strap. 

I’ll wear it/use it a while as is and if I don’t get used to that strap there, I’ll look into moddling it. But for now it’s fine!

Fat guy in a holster;

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My view;

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And the bonus, I can pick and chose what I want to carry;

4-5/8″ Blackhawk;

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Ruger MK2;

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Beretta Stamped SAA;
(3.5″ barrel us a little short in there, but I think it’ll balance ok/hang ok)

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Browning BDM 9mm;
(Which is great for now since this is my usual winter woods carry gun. No bears then so I don’t need the .357 etc.)

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:)

Categories: Adventures, Alaska-Life, ATV, ATV Accessories, ATVing, Backcountry, Clothes, GetOutdoors, Guns, Hunting, Life-Philosophy, New Gear, Outdoors, Woods tools

Grousing around, Oct 2017

Grouse hunting… 
My first time out.

A friend and I have been trying to get out to do this together for about 2 years now, finally got to go. 

Ended up with his teen son along, and got two other friends to go, one that has a fancy German hunting dog.

We even put it off a week, last minute plans from last Monday so to make sure one guy could go… Turned out great, we got a few inches of snow in the week, make the birds more visible on the ground!

I borrowed a buddies 12ga auto shotgun to take since I don’t have one.

2.5 hour drive south to a 70 acre private property plot we have access to(Church bible camp) just north of Mt. Denali, and the foot hills of the Alaska Range.

 2.5wonderful hours hiking around in clear  5F weather, fantastic company and country… 4,000 grouse tracks everywhere. Millions of rabbit tracks.
Some fox and lynx tracks.

We’d talked about other game, and unfortunately lynx is closed until Dec 1st, but fox is open, and rabbit, and I was hoping to see a rabbit.   

And I wouldn’t have argues with getting a fox pelt either to be honest!

 Hiked 2.5 to 3 miles in flat country trails, open forest and fairly thick brush/black spruce country.

$$$ fancy hunting dog tracking all over the place. Really cool to see that, finally. (Friend has been trying to get me out to see the dog for almost 2 years now.)

Never saw an (game)animal.
No, take that back… we saw one camp robber. Lol.

Now, it was mid day by the time we got down there after we worked out some issues, drive was slow because of hairy roads in places…

We honestly figure the birds were all up in the trees roosting by the time we got out there, and once a spruce grouse is in a spruce tree it’s invisible.

But it was a fantastic trip regardless of not shooting anything! Really was fun just getting good out and enjoying God’s creation with some friends.

I didn’t actually take the shotgun after all. Talking to my friend that I’d planned this with,  he didn’t have one either, so he and his son would be with .22 rifles.  

I remembered that last year when we started talking about going, I bought a new Skinner sight for my Dad’s(now mine) Browning SA-22.

 Figured it was a great brush gun, it’s super small, light, and short,  points fast, be a dream to carry. It’s also a take down gun, for easy packing.

Also knew we’d be in Super dense cover at tines, and that 12ga is Loooonnnggg. Be a bitch to swing in the brush..

So I took the .22.
And it did pack and carry marvelously!  Do need to get a sling mouth set on it to make it a little easier, in thrvthick stuff (bith hands free)and a dedicated short pack case for it.

One other friend was supposed to have a single shot .410 along, but couldnt find it, so he had a 12 ga. pump.  Figured the other guy would gave a 12ga. But he chose to just wrangle his do for us.  But we did end up with one shotgun in the mix, for any fast flight shots.

The country;

The group minus me and the dog;

Two friends;

Same two friends in this shot, if you can find them… even the relatively open forest was hard visibility beyond 20 feet!

Tracks;

The .22;

Something cool (I think) I started doing with another tube fed gun, a Ruger MKII magazine makes a great speed loader. Just push the rounds off one at a time. Easier than a hand full of loose ammo. 

Cutlery that I took for cleaning animals;

The red Mora fixed blade I bought that morning… Had to take one guy to grab a hunting license before we went.

I was walking around the sporting goods store while he got it, killing time,
and was amazed to see real Mora knives for sale with the fishing gear!  Never seen them locally before, just online.  Even stranger, it’s in a small home town shop (one of a kind,  not a chain store).  Even though I do have a couple already, I couldn’t pass it up for $9.99 😉 

Anyway, still a great day without the birds, and the season is open all winter. Thinking I’ll start taking a .22 along with ice fishing trips etc. Never know what you might see! 

Categories: Adventures, Alaska-Life, Backcountry, GetOutdoors, Good Friends, Good Times, Guns, Hunting, New Gear, Outdoors, Sentimental, Wildlife, Winter

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