Hunting

Glass on the 30-06…. Again..

put a scope on my Remington 700 again, something I swore I’d never do.
Last time it wore glass was fall of ’15. I’d put a scope my buddy Swany gave me, on it just the fall before… Great gift, great scope, fit the gun well, worked fine etc. Theres a post on that Somewhere on this blog..
I just discovered that I Hate the feel of a rifle with a scope, and the added hassle of taking care of it.. Not that I throw a rifle around anyway, but can be Much less careful without a scope on them, and the balance and weight and area to grab it is so much better!

Back story being the rifle always had a 3-9×32(Navajo Rhino, yes thats a scope brand/model! that was put on it when it was new in ’67) on it as long as Dad had it, but the adjustments broke on me in ’13 and I ran it in just its iron sights that year and loved it. Went back to a scope basically out of assumed habit that time. It took exactly 2 hunting trips, 1 year for me to decide No, and I went to a peep sight and fiber optic front, since all my hunting was moose, low land, and sub 100 yards.

But at this point for the hunting I’m really enjoying, high country alpine tundra, and caribou, its harder without a scope, its simply long range hunting at probably moving targets.. Too steep of a curve with even a good peep sight, for me anyway. At this point.

SO, once again, scope is a gift from a hunting buddy, its been on his 30-06(a sporterized vintage 100 year old Enfield!) for at least 20 years.. He retired the rifle last fall and offered me the scope knowing I wanted to try one again for our high country hunts.

The one Swany gave me was a 3-9×40, older production Tasco World Class. Great scope, but bulky, and it now lives on my Marlin model 60 .22
This one is a Simmons, 3-9×32, much less bulky, still old enough to be well built, and been surviving on an ’06 in Alaska for decades, I (should) will know not to worry about it.

Putting it on now since I have to go do a range trip to check sight in anyway before the bear trip, and figure what the hell, can’t hurt. Ironically the longest ranges for bear this trip will probable be 100 or 150 yards at the extreme max. Even with the scope on and max point blank of my load being around 320 yards, I probably wont let myself shoot past 150 to 200 extreme max anyway… But we’ll see.

I have a terrible feeling I’m going to hate it again, but trying to give it a fair chance.

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Thankfully rings and bases I had for the Tasco work for this. Want to say its Leupold rings on,,, Can[t remenber the bases. Been a while… lol. Had to steal the screws from a new set of Weaver rails, couldn’t find the ones for these bases, must have stole them for something else.

Yes it seems to sit well back… SO did the Tasco. I actually need it back a touch more for perfect eye relief, with the recoil pad I have on… But its good enough. If I REALLY like this, I’ll cut the stock and re-mount the recoil pad at a good LOP for me and fix it… Should probably do that anyway its a touch long regaurdless of the sights, but not as a problem.

One nice thing, the peep sight base is fully side mounted, so I’m leaving it. Its also index marked, and the rest of it as an insert is locked, and marked, as is the front sight… IE it can drop in and I’ll know if anything is off. I think the allen wrench for the rings and a screwdriver are going Everywhere with the gun, with the rest of the peep sight, if I ever need to swap back.

Categories: Backcountry, Field gear, Guns, Gunsmithing, Hunting, Rifles, Scopes and Sights, Shooting, Traditional | 1 Comment

Snack knife to Hunting knife.

Little post a few days ago mentioned getting this knife back into my travel kit.
Good thing I did!
Its actually not been in the truck, but in my lunch/snack box. One day a little while ago, transfering gear to a friends truck to go shooting(target) I grabbed the snack box for a light lunch.

That meant that later I had a sharp single blade thats easier to clean than the twin blade I was pocket carying, when an impromptu bunny hunt came up..

:D

Little fur ball kept getting curious about the sound or something and running out into the range (gravel pit) we were using.

He knew I’ve been wanting to rabbit hunt a while, so my buddy said go for it if I wanted. 3rd appearance of the critter, 2nd active stalk I managed to connect before he completely disappeared again.

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Great knife for the task, thin point was easy to control, handle comfortable, good reach, and laser sharp.

Guy that was with me gave a couple ideas and left me to it, so I just basically taught myself to clean/skin a rabbit. He said I did great especially when he found out I’d never cleaned anything but fish before!

:D

Was too hot and tired that night to do the grilling we’d planned, but roast bunny is on the menu soon. Will take pics!

Categories: Adventures, Alaska-Life, Case Knives, Cowboy, EDC, EDC/MT use, Field gear, Food, GetOutdoors, Good Friends, Good Times, Hunting, knives, Outdoors, Pocket knives, Preparedness, Summertime, Traditional, Truck EDC, Truck gear, Wildlife

Un re-chambering a Winchester model 90

A bit of history;

This gun was, somewhat obviously, designed in 1890. For a while they were the model 1890, then they became the model 90. Originally chambered for .22L, .22Short and later the .22LR, and then .22 WRF.

They are THE original gallery guns, made famous in shooting galleries and fairs.

This one was made in 1932, and chambered in .22WRF

.22WRF was(is) a higher powered .22, more oomph than a .22 long or long rifle.

Later, the .22 WMR, know usually as .22 Mag was introduced. Very simply it is a WRF that’s been lengthened to hold more powder. Same as the way we got .357 Magnum from .38 Special.

Being bigger, it was more powerful. And popular. It in fact became so popular that the. 22 WRF became obsolete, after a while no longer chambered, and then ammunition stopped being made.

Around that time this gun was modified, to chamber, feed, and fire, the longer .22 WMR.

The only difference in all of these guns for different cartridges, is obviously the barrels chamber, and, as I found out, the carrier.

I had figured that since the shorter round would chamber, (like a 38 in a 357 chamber, the length difference is no problem at all) it would cycle the shorter rounds, and I could fire either round. Much the same as other .22 rifles that will cycle and fire .22 short, long and long rifle.

But “why?” I hear you ask, if the ammo isn’t made?

Well, actually Now, the ammo is made! Its been brought back, from popular demand, so that the older guns can be used!

And I’m glad for it! .22 WMR is a fine round for varmints, and predators. But I hunt neither, and its far too expensive for range/target use. Its too powerful for small game hunting, destroying far too much meat, in a messy fashion.

The .22 WRF on the other hand is light enough for small game hunting, but still a little more oomph than the common .22LR, for range, and bigger animals. Basically its a half step between .22LR and .22WMR.

Now, its not exactly cheap being a specialty ammo, but its about the same cost as most .22 WMR.

Still a little spendy for plinking wabbits, but then again, hunting with a 84 year old pump action is worth it!

Back to my problem;

The carrier is of a controlled feed design, meaning it fully controls the cartridge for its entire journey from magazine to chamber.

This is good, because it allows the gun to function in Any position. Even upside down! Try to do that with most bolt actions, or lever actions. 😉

This is also bad, in our case because it makes the carier a much more exact fir to thr round it carries.

To do so, the cartridge doesn’t just sit on top of the carrier as in a lot of designs, but sits surounded by it. Thus the carrier has to have a channel for the cartridge that is the exact length.

This is important, because, as I found out, how far the round goes into the carrier determines if the next round leaves the magazine. The tip of the round is the cartridge stop while the carrier is down. After if starts up, another part holds the next round.

Whoever converted this gun, deepened the chamber in the barrel, And deepened the channel in the carrier.

Here is a .22 WMR, in this guns carrier.

Here is what happens if you load it with the shorter .22 WRF;

With one round already inside the carrier, what you’r seeing is thd next round un line, partially into the carrier, partially inside the magazine.

And at that poing the gun jams, since that second round holds the carrier from lifting.

Here it is from another view;

Its not a big difference in length, but its enough to cause a jam. WMR on top, WRF below.

So, what we need, is either the cartridge to be longer, so it holds the next round out of the carrier, or the carrier channel to be shallower, providing the same effect.

Here is the shorter WRF inserted just far enough to sit its tip where a WMR tip would be, to hold the next round foreward.

So, our solution, is this part here;

Shown with its retaining set screw.

Like most firearms modifications or repairs, it’s a very small, very simple part, and (relatively) easy to make.

Just needing made to Exacting specifications, thus it’s a deceptively simple little chunk of brass.

It was simple to make, but it wasn’t exactly “easy”. Nor was it quick to make or fit.

Here it is installed, and with its set screw hole drilled and tapped in the carrier itself.

And here you can see its very simple function; It holds the cartridge foreward to where the tip needs to sit, where a WMR tip would be, to keep the next round from feeding, and causing our jam. Simple!

It’s brass because its a low to zero wear part, and it’s an easy material to fit/work with. I could have used steel and heat treated it for wear, but its just not necessary, in my opinion.

It has a “C” shape, to allow a channel for the extractor to pass through, which is what pushes the cartridge forward for chambering. Matching the channel in the carrier itself.

And it works flawlessly! The gun now chambers and fires WRF ammunition again. The only thing I lost was the abillity to Also use WMR ammo. Its still a single cartridge gun. Snall loss, as I’ve explained, I have no real use for WMR.

Overall this was one of my simplest gun fixes. It was interesting to figure out, and tedious to make/fit the part, but was really rather simple, and very fun. Some fixes similar to this have required several days of welding up new steel onto a carrier or bolt, and grinding/filing/refitting it down to size, repeatedly, until it works.

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, A.I.O., Brass, Customized, Fabrication, Field gear, Guns, Gunsmithing, Hunting, Modifications, old tools, Repairs, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting, Winchesters

Guns, woods, birds, bunnies.

Just a little set of pictures from a day out this week.

Remnants of a light snow we had meaning the grouse would be easier to see, and 45F degree weather, promted me to got hunting for a little while.

Lots of bunny sign, tracks, and trails. Lots of fox tracks, and I’d guess what was a lynx track too.

Saw one bunny, too late, as he bounded ouf of range into deep thick cover.

Later I saw one grouse too, and had a couple good shots open but by that time it was getting late, and I was on my way home, my heart wasnt really in it then.

I completed the stalk to where I could have taken it, but decided not to. At that poing the opportunity was enough. 🙂

Overall unproductive, but it was a grwat couplr hours out and about anyway!

Categories: 22 guns, Adventures, Alaska-Life, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Good Times, Guns, Hunting, Just Plain Fun, Life-Philosophy, Outdoors, Rimfire, weather and seasons, Wildlife

A rare sharp.

Dug this one out mid last week.

Don’t carry it much any more, for fear of losing it… Hate that I do that though so I got it out. Pretty unique knife, a little ironically because it’s just a cheap Rough Rider.. You have to go back to Schrade in the 60s and 70s to get another one of thus pattern in this size.
Modern copperhead pattern is close but not the same, this is a true folding hunter, scaled to 4″ overall closed. Love it! Perfect size for the pattern IMNSHO, wanted one ever since I’d seen the Schrade, so I jumped on this one when I saw it…. Eeeek, gotta be 9 or 10 years ago now.
I’ve never been able to find another one either! Even at the time I got it, it was the only Rough Rider like it I could find.

Categories: EDC, Hunting, knives

Do take heed of low velocity warnings!

So… when you read or hear warnings about low power ammo and long barrels… Heed them!

Been playing around with some .22 Aguila Super Colibri, which are a 20 grain bullet over no powder; primer only. Supposedly a 550 fps muzzle velocity… Out of what I’m not sure. I’ve read they’re designed for use in pistols(revolvers, it would never cycle a semiautomatic) only.

I like them because they’re so quiet. Even out of my 4″ Bearcat the report is a mild pop, barely a sharp crack to it. No hearing protection needed, and you’ll never annoy a neighbor with them.

Figured what the hell I’d try them in my 1953 Marlin 39A (only non semi auto .22LR rifle I have). Bonus is they are shorter than the length of a standard 22LR; I can get 22 of them in the gun!

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Left to right; Standard Federal LR, Remington Shorts, and Aguila Super Colibri.

Down side is that this rifle is old school, and has a full 24″ barrel.

Every inch counts when your building velocity, I was betting they’d be faster than 550 out of a rifle length. But every inch is against you on low power rounds.

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That’s the tip of the bullet that’s stuck in the tip of the barrel!

That was the first round I fired. Popped it out with a cleaning rod.

Then I reloaded. 🙂 :D

The next 21 rounds all fired and cleared the barrel fine. The first one was the lower one in standard velocity spreads? Bore fouling? Weak primer? A fluke? Who knows.

They’re accurate and fun at backyard range, but you better be damn sure you can see or hear them hit something! There is no recoil and basically no report, the hammer fall click is louder!

If I get some time to get it out I’ll fire a few over the chronograph.

And yes, in case your wondering, these are “Super” Colibri… There is a standard non super version, same bullet, at a little over 100 fps slower! If I get any of those, I definitely Won’t be trying them in long barrels!

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, GetOutdoors, Guns, Hunting, Marlin, Outdoors, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting

New, cheap day packs.

I needed…

wanted…

uhhm…. yeah 😉

Lets say, saw a need for 😉 a couple light packs, to fill out gaps in capacity capabilities for day bags.

My main and favorite grab and go day bag for several years now has been a Black Diamond 16L pack. Its small, light, durrable, and can really be stuffed with day trip/hike essentials.

But it’s on the smaller side at times. Two years ago I acquired a 25L TNF (The North Face) Vault as an upgrade for those times.

It has the room I need on average, for day trips. But it has two problems; it has a stiff structured back panel that is a great idea, but horrendously uncomfortable.

And it’s bright red.

No matter what they say animals can and can’t see, I see little to no way of proving it… So I have a hard time taking bright colors on hunting trips.

On the other hand I find camo pointless, but thats another topic for another time. 🙂

So, I wanted another mid sized 25L to 35L pack for day hikes and day hunts, that wasn’t brightly colored.

And I also wanted a pack between that size, and the big 65L 3 day trip pack I have. An overnight day trip bag that wouldn’t be heavy or waste space. Mainly for my summer weight camping gear, where I don’t need the room for my 20° bag or many, if any extra clothes. Went with 45L.

I ended up with a claimed 35L that I’d say is around 20L maybe 25L actual capacity. And the other, claimed to be 45L, around 30L, 35L absolute max.

Not optimal. But then, for $10, and $15, shipped, respectively the small and large, I can’t complain much. 😉

It was worth the risk, and while not exactly what I needed, they’ll help out. I’ll just still need to find something in the 40L to 45L area for a summer time overnight trip bag.

For the smaller, I went with green, so I’m comfortable with it for hunting trips.

Draw closure top, with top flap. Pocket under flap.

And one ob the top of the flap;

Standard stretchy side pockets;

The outer sleeve pocket on the frontvis the same stretchy material.

Nice straps;

Grab handle leaves a little to be desired;

And, the nifty feature I liked, the inner pocket on the top flap is double zippered;

Turn the pocket insige out, roll the bag into it and zip;

Will make neatly packing it in my main hunting trip bag/dry bag much easier!

Overall it seems well built, and while light weight materials , also seems like it will be durable enough. Time will tell.

For the other, since it was planned as a non hunting hike pack, color didn’t matter much. So I went with something I liked, and something I’m garranteed to not lose when I set it down.

So sue me, I like purple. 🙂

It is 2 main compartments, small side mesh pockets, and a tiny zipped one on the front. And a bottom access area, that when fully opened/pressed out to capacity almost fills the whole main compartment! Bottom easy access for sleeping bag? Or ive seen the same made for shoes.. I’m sure ill find a use, but its a little odd in its size.

Chosen for it’s everal cord locked bungee attachment points, compression straps, and bottom straps that I liked the look of for hanging my tent on.

This one is heavier materials than the other, has a more solid feel to it.

I want to say it feels more solidly built as well, but that might be an illusion of the heavier materials. As I said above, only time will tell how they survive, but I’m thinking theyll be fine. 😉

Great wide padded straps;

Hip belt comes mid gut on me, like most do and is deathly short… I’ll probably cut it off. Nice adjustable/removable sternum strap though!

And I was pleasantly surprised by this;

First time I’ve ever seen a heavy dedicated carry handle on a backpack! And it still has the usual carry/hanging loop too.

Overall, I’m pleased for $25 total. Hell, I think I’d have been pleased with just the purple one for that much, or a little more. 🙂

Categories: Backpacks, Camping, Camping gear, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Hiking, Hunting, New Gear, Outdoors

An Axe Man’s Bucksaw Part 1

This obe is otherwise known as The Moon Saw. That name to be explained later though. 🙂

I’ve been wanting to do this project for a couple months now. Took a while to get other things out of the way… Pressing household maintenance like broken water tanks, and no running water kept cropping up! (Among other little things that Eat time).

I knew I wanted to do a 24″ saw, so I went and picked up a blade early last month. I actually got a whole swede saw. A blade was $8. A Fiskars saw with the blade was $11. Yeah, might as well buy the $3 saw with it, and have it!

Then it took a month for me to get time, and some shop space made to do it.

I neded some large paper for patterning another project, so I sat down and started drawing designs. I could have gone with dead simple straight side/handle bars, and been a LOT simpler and easier…

Bug I figured if I was going to do it, I might as well do what I liked.

The one I built is actually the second design I had drawn, and while the other was thought out over 3 days, this one I drew and finalized in 10 minutes. And liked it more!

(Original design on left, axe style on right)

You can see where the name comes from, if you notice the fawns foot handle ends, and “S” shapes. I had my hatchet handle on the bench at the time, and was holding it, such a nice grip; So I traced it, reversed it, traced again, and blended the contours some.

Simple!

More to be seen soon.

Categories: Adventure Metal Works, Axes, Backcountry, Camping gear, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Hunting, New Gear, Outdoors, wood processing, Woods tools, Woodshop, Woodwork

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