Guns

Winchester Model 90 overview.

Posted about my re-modification, and realized I hadn’t really shown all of the rifle. So here we go! 🙂

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Its not without issues, but overall a pretty clean gun. Serial # dates it to 1932.

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Needs a finish job, as you can see its “in the white”, it was professionally stripped at some point, It’s mostly bare metal. Probably should be blued. I’d really love to have it cerakoted a bright blue though. Maybe someday.

Came with the tape on it. The front tape holds the mag hanger, some yutz tried to drift it out, didn’t know they turn into place. The stock tape is apparently for grip, I had it off, the wood and tang are fine. I put if back because I didn’t have time to deal with stripping the glue residue at the time.

As mentioned elsewhere, it’s actually been re-chambered to, and the carrier modded to feed .22WMR, back when .22 WRF was obsolete. Since I can get it now, and since Mag is so hard on small game I re-modded the carrier so I can now shoot WRFs again.

She ain’t perfect, but she’s a fun shooter, I thoroughly enjoy it!

Categories: Alaska-Life, Customized, Field gear, Good Friends, Guns, Repairs, Rifles, Winchesters | Leave a comment

LCP Leather, 1.0

I’ve only had it about 1.5 weeks, not a lot of carry yet, so I really have no need for anything different than the pocket holster, yet.

But I’m sure a time will come when I want to belt carry it, so why not go ahead and make ond of my holsters for it?

No construction pics this time. Its the same as my last two, the first for the Bersa, then one for my Bearcat(Both can be found on the blog), this one is just scaled down slightly for the LCP.

I lost a little of my preferred forward “FBI” cant, but its still fine. Small notch to clear the mag release; This way it could get pushed, but I was more woried about it being pushed with the leather over it. This way its shielded/flush with the leather.

No retention strap yet. Its a VERY tight fit right now, plenty of hold. After it breaks in and stretches some, I’ll look at adding a strap, that way the fit and length will be right.

With its inspiration, the first of them, made for the Bersa. Thatcone is beoke in, but still snug, and still works great after 3 or 4 years.(Edit; I got curious and had to check. 6 years! Made in august of 2013!)

Honestly, the LCP2 actually fit the Bersa holster rather well. It would have worked, except the strap length.

Buf it was a touch too deep, I’d end up bending up the lower tip of the holster in use, and the long strap would be annoying.

Categories: Custom, Fabrication, Field gear, Guns, Holsters, Leather, New Gear, Sewing, Soft Goods | 1 Comment

Ruger LCP II

New EDC added recently! New toy, and new weapon too. All in one! 🙂

Kinda an impulse buy. I’d wanted to shoot and look at a 1st gen LCP last year. Then changed to the LCP2 after I got to shoot one in the spring. I just couldn’t justify the $$ till now.

I’d started to buy a $100 to $140 knife a couple weeks ago and realized it was a single days wage away from the gun. No brainer! 😉

My favored LGS has an online live inventory, showed the black for $295 and the FDE/Jungke green for $305. For $10, I can get fancy cerakote and not be boring black? Why not! 😉
I grabbed cash and headed to town.

SNAFU in their database, the gun was gone.
The guy actually had a slight panic moment when the online and their internal inventory showed it in stock, but he couldn’t find it, not even in the safe!
Turns out it had been sent to their store in the next town, sold there, and didn’t get pulled from the inventory here. He orderd another one, and I put my name on the list to be called. He said probably be in by that weekend. That was the Monday two weeks ago.
Took week and a half to come, with 3 updates on ETA. Then they missed calling me when it did– busy place, its understandable.

So yeah, impulse buy that took 2 weeks to do… lol.

On the flip side, the actual purchase was a breeze, background check came back in 10 minutes, I was in, and out in half hour flat, if that long. 4pm I arrived there, by 4:45 I was at the range ~8 miles away, (and that’s crossing town in rush hour traffic included!) shooting. 😀

With my previous CCW, a Bersa/Firestorm. 380.

Impulse but not a blind buy. As I mentioned, I got to shoot one before. A friend at church has and carries a first gen LCP, and I’d asked if he could bring it to a mens shooting weekend we had in the spring. He forgot, but someone else there had a LCP2 and I got a couple mags through it.

Great shooter, light, compact! Just what I’d been looking for. My Bersa 380 gets a little big sometimes.

I swear the Bersa gets heavier after you have it on for 8 hours straight!

I wanted something smaller, lighter, and pocketable so I could tuck a shirt, or do away with a cover shirt/jacket if I wanted to.

The Bersa I’ve had for over a decade(wow… closer to 15 years I think..).

It amazes me, when I got the Bersa, it was a pocket gun!

The micro polymer guns hadn’t really come into play, or werent as common… At least to me they weren’. I don’t remember that craze starting til a few years later. Now that class of gun is still a small carry, but for a pocket gun its HUGE!

The Ruger weighs Literally half as much (unloaded specs), is smaller, thinner. But at only a single round loss! Shoots good to boot, with amazingly controlable recoil for its weight.

But anyway, back to the range; I was Extremely happy to be hitting within 2″or 3″ of a clay pigeons at 20 or 25 yards, some rounds hitting them, within my 2nd mag! Those sights aint much but they’re really actually pretty good! The ergonomics and fantastic trigger help, it shoots like a much bigger pistol.

I was expecting to need a LOT of practice to get “on the pie plate” accuracy at half that distance.

Sorry, no target pics. The range was surprisingly busy for a cold wet, snowy saturday (everyone getting in any time they can before its freaking cold) so when I was hitting remnants of other targets so easy in my first couple mags, I decided to hell with trying to get a cold range to set anything out for a grouping, and just had fun with it. 🙂

It comes with a light but very nice pocket holster, that works really well. It adds some bulk to pocketing it, but with no safety other than the center trigger bar, you REALLY dont want anything getting into that trigger guard with it in your pocket!

Covering the trigger/guard etc is the best, and also having Nothing else in the pocket with it.

So far the holster is nice, light, comfortable, and provides a great draw. Even including reaching into my pocket, this is a smoother, simpler, easier draw than I’ve ever had with non pocket guns!

Here it is in the pocket holster, on top of my homemade Bersa holster.

It does actually fit in the Bersa holster too, and rather well. Just a bit short, and of course the retention strap is far too long. I might use it as a pattern to make one for the Ruger.

Serriously considering just adding belt loops to the pocket holster though. Would be simple to do, and would make it a dual use holster.

Will note that I’m Not completely replacing the Bersa. It will still spend a lot of time as a truck gun(where its spent most of its time the last few months as I’ve gotten less and less fond of the weight to carry), and I’ll still carry it on shorter days out… But its just gotten to be too much on looonnnggg days on my feet, which us where the LCP will really shine.

Its not like I carry every day anyway. Its hit or miss for me, and I can alternate as needed, or not. Options are great to have, no matter how often you use them!

For a last fun comparison, here is my pocket .22. 6 rounds of .22 Short. The lcp is smaller, thinner and LIGHTER!

Categories: EDC, Field gear, Guns, Holsters, New Gear | 1 Comment

Un re-chambering a Winchester model 90

A bit of history;

This gun was, somewhat obviously, designed in 1890. For a while they were the model 1890, then they became the model 90. Originally chambered for .22L, .22Short and later the .22LR, and then .22 WRF.

They are THE original gallery guns, made famous in shooting galleries and fairs.

This one was made in 1932, and chambered in .22WRF

.22WRF was(is) a higher powered .22, more oomph than a .22 long or long rifle.

Later, the .22 WMR, know usually as .22 Mag was introduced. Very simply it is a WRF that’s been lengthened to hold more powder. Same as the way we got .357 Magnum from .38 Special.

Being bigger, it was more powerful. And popular. It in fact became so popular that the. 22 WRF became obsolete, after a while no longer chambered, and then ammunition stopped being made.

Around that time this gun was modified, to chamber, feed, and fire, the longer .22 WMR.

The only difference in all of these guns for different cartridges, is obviously the barrels chamber, and, as I found out, the carrier.

I had figured that since the shorter round would chamber, (like a 38 in a 357 chamber, the length difference is no problem at all) it would cycle the shorter rounds, and I could fire either round. Much the same as other .22 rifles that will cycle and fire .22 short, long and long rifle.

But “why?” I hear you ask, if the ammo isn’t made?

Well, actually Now, the ammo is made! Its been brought back, from popular demand, so that the older guns can be used!

And I’m glad for it! .22 WMR is a fine round for varmints, and predators. But I hunt neither, and its far too expensive for range/target use. Its too powerful for small game hunting, destroying far too much meat, in a messy fashion.

The .22 WRF on the other hand is light enough for small game hunting, but still a little more oomph than the common .22LR, for range, and bigger animals. Basically its a half step between .22LR and .22WMR.

Now, its not exactly cheap being a specialty ammo, but its about the same cost as most .22 WMR.

Still a little spendy for plinking wabbits, but then again, hunting with a 84 year old pump action is worth it!

Back to my problem;

The carrier is of a controlled feed design, meaning it fully controls the cartridge for its entire journey from magazine to chamber.

This is good, because it allows the gun to function in Any position. Even upside down! Try to do that with most bolt actions, or lever actions. 😉

This is also bad, in our case because it makes the carier a much more exact fir to thr round it carries.

To do so, the cartridge doesn’t just sit on top of the carrier as in a lot of designs, but sits surounded by it. Thus the carrier has to have a channel for the cartridge that is the exact length.

This is important, because, as I found out, how far the round goes into the carrier determines if the next round leaves the magazine. The tip of the round is the cartridge stop while the carrier is down. After if starts up, another part holds the next round.

Whoever converted this gun, deepened the chamber in the barrel, And deepened the channel in the carrier.

Here is a .22 WMR, in this guns carrier.

Here is what happens if you load it with the shorter .22 WRF;

With one round already inside the carrier, what you’r seeing is thd next round un line, partially into the carrier, partially inside the magazine.

And at that poing the gun jams, since that second round holds the carrier from lifting.

Here it is from another view;

Its not a big difference in length, but its enough to cause a jam. WMR on top, WRF below.

So, what we need, is either the cartridge to be longer, so it holds the next round out of the carrier, or the carrier channel to be shallower, providing the same effect.

Here is the shorter WRF inserted just far enough to sit its tip where a WMR tip would be, to hold the next round foreward.

So, our solution, is this part here;

Shown with its retaining set screw.

Like most firearms modifications or repairs, it’s a very small, very simple part, and (relatively) easy to make.

Just needing made to Exacting specifications, thus it’s a deceptively simple little chunk of brass.

It was simple to make, but it wasn’t exactly “easy”. Nor was it quick to make or fit.

Here it is installed, and with its set screw hole drilled and tapped in the carrier itself.

And here you can see its very simple function; It holds the cartridge foreward to where the tip needs to sit, where a WMR tip would be, to keep the next round from feeding, and causing our jam. Simple!

It’s brass because its a low to zero wear part, and it’s an easy material to fit/work with. I could have used steel and heat treated it for wear, but its just not necessary, in my opinion.

It has a “C” shape, to allow a channel for the extractor to pass through, which is what pushes the cartridge forward for chambering. Matching the channel in the carrier itself.

And it works flawlessly! The gun now chambers and fires WRF ammunition again. The only thing I lost was the abillity to Also use WMR ammo. Its still a single cartridge gun. Snall loss, as I’ve explained, I have no real use for WMR.

Overall this was one of my simplest gun fixes. It was interesting to figure out, and tedious to make/fit the part, but was really rather simple, and very fun. Some fixes similar to this have required several days of welding up new steel onto a carrier or bolt, and grinding/filing/refitting it down to size, repeatedly, until it works.

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, A.I.O., Brass, Customized, Fabrication, Field gear, Guns, Gunsmithing, Hunting, Modifications, old tools, Repairs, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting, Winchesters | Leave a comment

Guns, woods, birds, bunnies.

Just a little set of pictures from a day out this week.

Remnants of a light snow we had meaning the grouse would be easier to see, and 45F degree weather, promted me to got hunting for a little while.

Lots of bunny sign, tracks, and trails. Lots of fox tracks, and I’d guess what was a lynx track too.

Saw one bunny, too late, as he bounded ouf of range into deep thick cover.

Later I saw one grouse too, and had a couple good shots open but by that time it was getting late, and I was on my way home, my heart wasnt really in it then.

I completed the stalk to where I could have taken it, but decided not to. At that poing the opportunity was enough. 🙂

Overall unproductive, but it was a grwat couplr hours out and about anyway!

Categories: 22 guns, Adventures, Alaska-Life, Field gear, GetOutdoors, Good Times, Guns, Hunting, Just Plain Fun, Life-Philosophy, Outdoors, Rimfire, weather and seasons, Wildlife | 1 Comment

EDC Catch up, fall 2019

Well, here we go again, big dump of pics of pocket dumps from the last 3 or 4 months. Hope you enjoy!

Categories: Adventures, Alaska-Life, Daily-cary-log, EDC, EDC/MT use, Flashlights, Guns, Jewelry, knives, Lighters, Multitools, New Gear, old tools, Outdoors, Pocket knives, Watches, weather and seasons | 3 Comments

EDC Mid May to Mid July 2018

Categories: Daily-cary-log, EDC, EDC/MT use, Guns, Hanks, knives, Leather, Lighters, Multitools, Pocket knives, Summertime

Do take heed of low velocity warnings!

So… when you read or hear warnings about low power ammo and long barrels… Heed them!

Been playing around with some .22 Aguila Super Colibri, which are a 20 grain bullet over no powder; primer only. Supposedly a 550 fps muzzle velocity… Out of what I’m not sure. I’ve read they’re designed for use in pistols(revolvers, it would never cycle a semiautomatic) only.

I like them because they’re so quiet. Even out of my 4″ Bearcat the report is a mild pop, barely a sharp crack to it. No hearing protection needed, and you’ll never annoy a neighbor with them.

Figured what the hell I’d try them in my 1953 Marlin 39A (only non semi auto .22LR rifle I have). Bonus is they are shorter than the length of a standard 22LR; I can get 22 of them in the gun!

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Left to right; Standard Federal LR, Remington Shorts, and Aguila Super Colibri.

Down side is that this rifle is old school, and has a full 24″ barrel.

Every inch counts when your building velocity, I was betting they’d be faster than 550 out of a rifle length. But every inch is against you on low power rounds.

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That’s the tip of the bullet that’s stuck in the tip of the barrel!

That was the first round I fired. Popped it out with a cleaning rod.

Then I reloaded. 🙂 :D

The next 21 rounds all fired and cleared the barrel fine. The first one was the lower one in standard velocity spreads? Bore fouling? Weak primer? A fluke? Who knows.

They’re accurate and fun at backyard range, but you better be damn sure you can see or hear them hit something! There is no recoil and basically no report, the hammer fall click is louder!

If I get some time to get it out I’ll fire a few over the chronograph.

And yes, in case your wondering, these are “Super” Colibri… There is a standard non super version, same bullet, at a little over 100 fps slower! If I get any of those, I definitely Won’t be trying them in long barrels!

Categories: 22 ammunition, 22 guns, GetOutdoors, Guns, Hunting, Marlin, Outdoors, Rifles, Rimfire, Shooting

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