ATV

First time for everything…

First time I’ve ever UN hot wired a vehicle! 😉 

Back story is as follows; A buddy had his ATV stolen out of his yard in May. Insurance payed off and he got a new one… 3 weeks later, the troopers said “hey, we got your wheeler back”.

He’s run out of time for projects this summer, but would like to sell it to cover the difference between the cost of the new one and the insurance paid. 

So, I’m putting it back together and selling it for him.

If it was a horse I’d say rode hard, put up wet… They didn’t baby it, but I wouldn’t say they thrashed it. 

 Needs a few things cleaned up, and put back together since they had started to strip it.  

First up was fixing the hacked hot wire job. Then test ridding to make sure they didn’t screw the driveline etc.. It all works great!  

Wiring like this isn’t too hard when you have a full wiring diagram to start with (free download of full factory service manual!) 

And, your supplied with a new switch, and the proper plug for it.  Got wire extension colors close on a couple… 

Scrounged and shortened the harness wires for an aftermarket switch pod I’d bought for mine. 

The harness wires to the switch had been cut so short I had to add something, but having them all one color would be a pain. 

The next guy is going to wonder what the heck, but at least he won’t be fighting to track a wire in a bundle of all red or all black wires..  

Voila;

😆

Couple days work on a few little cosmetic details and rewiring a winch, and then you should see it on Craigslist Fairbanks.  ðŸ™‚

Categories: ATV, ATVing, Automotive Work, Damages, EDC/MT use, Improviser, Modifications, Outdoors, Vehicles, Wiring, Wrenching | 1 Comment

ATV Clutch repair! (Part 4) 

The previous parts of this saga, were;

1.

The clutch going out.

 A weight bushing and shaft worn, and a broken weight roller on the spider, jamming between weight and roller, late last fall. 

Parked it for the winter.

2.

Then this spring, I decided that if I took out the pivot shafycfir the weight, and that the weight couldn’t come out without disassembly of the clutch, it wouldn’t bind and jam,  and should work on 3 weights. 

Which it did, flawlessly.

For about 3 months. 

3.

Then it managed to get the magic amount of rpm, clearance,  and weight orientation to throw the weight. About 3.5 weeks ago. 

Turned out at that point, that when still “floating” in the clutch, even though the weight wasn’t helping engage the clutch, that it’s trapped weight/mass was balancing the clutch! 

Horrendous vibration ensued, causing engine over heating, a high pitched hum, and increasing belt slipage. And eventually would no doubt eat engine bearings… 

I rode it some for work around the homestead,  but I’m the clutch slippage was getting worse every time I ran it. 

So… part 4.

I decided to replace the weight shaft, and bushing, making both myself to save cost. 

To add back the weight, but held in this time as intended to be, and eliminate the play that allowed it to bind up. The broken roller on the spider could wait a little while. 

Being lazy won out over being broke. Twice. First time about 3 weeks ago, I was going to lathe turn a new pivot shaft. 
Was easier to buy a new one. 

This time I was going to make the bushing for the weight … Never had the time or drive to do it for over a week. 

Found a atv/cycle parts place with amazingly reasonable shipping rates to Alaska (bikebandit.com). 

Few days later I have shiny little parts! 

Got 4 since everything online says you’ll crush a couple learning to press them in.

 Uhuh. 

I used a new bushing over the old shaft, slid through the old bushing/weight, nut on top to act as a stop, and drove the old one out while seating the new one…  

Slight bur created on end of new one trimmed out with a drill bit by hand. Took 5 min total, if that. And I have 3 bushings left! 

If nothing else I have the bushings to later do the other 3 weights. 
Then came instalation in the clutch.

REALLY wanted to do this without pulling the clutch off the engine. I bought a puller last winter, but there are a lot of horror stories about broken clutch pullers, and having to then cut the clutch up to get it off. If you got a cheap puller.  I did get a cheap, but not the cheapest puller… 

Yeah. 

 Couldn’t compress the clutch into the belt loop (as it does when the clutch is working, to open the area around the weight) as I had hoped I could, with clamps.  

Suddenly realized I could enlarge that belt loop, and clearance in it, by letting the belt tighten on the secondary clutch!

 Pry open secondary clutch, pull belt foreward, press primary clutch half inward, hold in place with clamp, insert weight, drive in new shaft(light press fit in clutch), install nuts, tighten. 

Voila! That was amazingly easy. Not sure why, but God sure does like me!

 plugged in the belt safety switch in the cover, wired the cover to the rack as high as possible,  kept my leg out of the clutches for a short test ride in the yard (don’t try this at home kids).

 NO MORE VIBRATION! Works like a DREAM!!  Took less than an hour total! $50 max total spent, used a whopping $11 in parts! 

If I’d known that could go that easy, I’d have gotten the parts and done it months ago!  

Bolted cover on and rode it 10 miles; perfect! No vibration, no high pitch buzz, no belt slip, no motor over heating, good clutch engagement!! 

Back to the way it was last year(yikes, hard to believe its been 10 months it first messed up!) before any of the clutch issues!!  
Now, technically I still need to replace the clutch center spider, that houses the (broken)roller that the weight runs on. 

But given how little wear there is on the weight compared to the rest of the worn parts, I think it is causing very little damage, very slowly.   

I’m pretty sure it can wait a month or two of reasonable riding, for me to save the funds to get the spider,  and build the tools needed to disassemble the clutch to change it. 

I will also be periodically checking on the play in that weight on the shaft–

(and, as a side point it’s now the tightest of all four… the other 4 bushings could use done within a couple years m, I’m sure.)

–because,  there is a section where the wear had eaten into the weight, that the new bushing is unsupported. 

Probably be fine for a long time, but I’ll check it from time to time just to be sure.  

Might just weld up that spot when I have it apart to do the spider. Or spring for a new weight.   But unless it starts to bind again,  I can’t see this causing any wear being a problem, for a while anyway. 

I’ve also decided that even though it still looks great, this couldn’t have been good for the belt, and I gave no idea how old it is anyway. I’ll put a new belt on it as soon as I can afford it. Hopefully when I replace the clutch spider; Since the clutch has to come off to change the belt (what idiot thought that up??!?), and I’d like to minimize times I have to do that… 

Categories: Adventures, Alaska-Life, ATV, ATVing, Automotive Work, Damages, GetOutdoors, Improviser, MacGyver, Modifications, Outdoors, Riding, Vehicles, Wrenching | 1 Comment

Small day trip.

Although, small is relative. This was long for me. 17.25 miles. 

In 3h18m. About 2 hours moving, 1 stopped(accumulatively).

 About 6.5 miles of back country high country trails, 5 miles of log roads,  and around 6 miles along the highway, some on a trail, some on the road itself. 

The rock cairn is along the log road, about halfway. It’s really cool, and new, wasn’t there this spring. 
One stop soon after the log roads was the local K-6 school, got to walk around on the grass and rest my back.
— much needed after the 3 miles of trail before the road, The roughest trails you can get, over tree roots and stumps in dense black spruce, and old growth white spruce (some big trees up there are a good 3.5′ or 4′ dia at the bottom!). Wish I’d taken pics while up there….

After that rough section I found a turn signal hanging loose. Thankfully the wire traps the nut!

Next stop was at the local dump transfer site, scrounge some bed rail steel, that I ran up the trail a mile to a buddies. Lucky the trail is wite through there,  it stuck out a foot on both sides! 😉
 Overall a really nice day out! Getting moving was welcome after some work I did early. It was 80Fs in the shade, an I saw 98

Categories: Adventures, Alaska-Life, ATV, ATVing, Backcountry, GetOutdoors, Riding, Summertime | 1 Comment

Parts make the world spin…

Among other things that spin. I’ll just leave these here; 

Currently trying to find a new one that I can afford. Actually, afford to ship is more accurate. 


The pivot wear;


[​IMG]

(Bonus points awarded if you can tell me what it is 😉😎😈 )

Categories: ATV, Automotive Work, Damages, Life-Philosophy, Vehicles, Wrenching | 3 Comments

New ATV Taillights.

Well, brake lights anyway. 

I’d had to take the stock brake/tail light off when I mounted the rear winch right where it had been.    

Then the rear accessory recievers, and the bumper, and it left very little realestate for putting it back– Especially since it’s bulb housing is 4″ off the back of the light… It needs 6″ depth where I had rack cross bars at. 

Had bought a 2″x3″ trailer marker light for this, but even it was a bit big to fit in the space I had left, and too thick to end up behind the bumper face. 

Then, I remembered the marker lights that came with my big trailer,  that were left over when I cheated and mounted reflectors instead.  1″x4″. Perfect for between rack and bumper, recessed from bumper face.  Just so happens that the space between the frame rails there is 9.75″. Perfect for 2. 

Made a mount bar from 1″x3/32″ 1095 bar stock. 


Paint,  mount lights,  and mount between the frame rail tails with the upper bumper bolts.  

(Ignore the scratched paint around holes… I scraped it up to ensure it all grounded.)

These lights are nice. They’re a base plate that mounts and wires, then a sealed  water proof 2 bulb unit plugs/snaps onto the top.  Should be easy to change when burnt out, but being sealed I can’t see them ever burning out very easilly. 

I wired it to the brake light circuit, intending to later add another couple lights under the rack as constant on taillights. 

 I might end up just making one of these a taillight, leaving one a brakelight. Won’t be symmetrical anymore, but it would work! We’ll see.  ðŸ™‚ 

Anyway, they’re pretty bright, here they are with the park brake locked, in daylight, on a bright sunny day.  

Categories: ATV, ATV Accessories, Custom, Fabrication, Modifications, Vehicles, Wiring | 2 Comments

ATV Turn Signals.

This has been a long time in the works.  I started ordering parts in early to mid June. Took about 3, 3.5 weeks for everything to come.  Then I had to find time to start it… 

Then decided I had to do the fuse block first, which took several days over last week. Now I’ve finally got the turn signals wired in, which also too a few days spread out over several total. 

Covering the fuse block install and the turn signals, I believe I have about 50 hours in this wiring and mounting. 

 Yes, I’m epically slow at wiring! 

Why turn signals? I dunno, just seemed like it’d be cool . 😎 Why not?  (No, unlike in some states I can’t make a quad street legal in Alaska.)

When I get the second flasher hooked up and have hazard lights, that could have a practical use, for emergencies, or simply visibility. But, these I don’t really need–but who cares? 😉

I bought two styles of small cheap motorcycle turn signals, off ebay. Serriously, these things were about $5 a pair!  

I originally intended the round ones for the rear, and the pointed ones for the front, to match a bumper bar angle.

But in the interim while waiting for them to come, I mounted the front bull bar,  and changed the bar angles and openings.. 

Tuned out great though, I really think the look fits better this way. 

I did the rears first, designed mounts, and spacing, working off the right side… Then got ready to mount the left side and realized it didn’t clear the rear winch motor. Oops. 

Slight rearrangement, flipped the brackets side to side, and turned over, and a small angle, and it’s perfect!

The brackets are a simple angle iron, but at least 3″ on one leg… Not common, and especially not in my scrap bin..  

I remembered some 2″x4″  rectangular tube I got from scrapping a BowFlex.  Slightly bigger than what I wanted. Then again I remembered some other older tube I had, that is 1.75″X3″. Used that. 

Cut off 1″ long, then split into two “L”s.  

Worked great, being tubing made by  forming then welding it up one side; It has a crease halfway along one long side. 

That gave me a perfect locator to drill mount holes exactly the same distance from the end on both. The crease also worked as a centering locator on the front bumper tube, keeps it from twisting as easy.   For the rears I used the other side Ls, that were flat and straight. 

 The rears mounted;

Bracket is on the lower bumper mount bolts, sandwiched between frame and bumper. Since these lights had ground wires, I ran them to the upper bumper bolts.

The fronts turned out to be really easy, using the exact same brackets, bolted to the bull bar, and angle trimmed to match it for looks. 

And amazingly they ground! Even though that bar isn’t directly bolted on, it has great continuity! I didn’t have to use the ground wires I first installed.  (These lights came setup to ground off their mount studs,  I was adding wires.)

Yes, I’m an electronics techs’ nightmare lol. 😉 Looks worse than it is actually, it’s all cleanly routed together(as clean as possible without a bare frame to start with anyway), down each side of the wheeler, and zip tied off. 

If I was installing everything at once it would get wire loom/covering… but I don’t have that luxury(kinda glad actually –that stuff is expensive!)

Hot wired test half way through;

Finally had to pull all the front plastic half way through… really wanted to do it with it on, but my hands are just too big.. lol. 

Getting the wires from the switch pod tail run..

More progress;

Yeah, I even did indicator lamps. getting fancy here, I know! The custom dash in my truck doesn’t even have the indicators installed and it’s been 4 years since I put that in! Lol. 

Finished, front;

And back(hard to see, but they’re there); 

And dash/switches; 

The other two switches on that pod are designed as a 2 position low/high light switch, and a momentary horn button. 

When I get the hazard flasher wired in, I’m going to use the light switch for them. Simply leaving nothing on the “low” circuit for “off”,  and “on” on the “high” beam position/circuit. 

Not completely sure about the momentary button yet(working on an idea though!). 

Categories: ATV, ATV Accessories, Automotive Work, Custom, EDC/MT use, Fabrication, Improviser, Modifications, Vehicles, Wiring, Wrenching | 2 Comments

Higher Work?

Got really really tired of everything being too low to work on, even sitting down…

 I do have a hydraulic motorcycle/atv lift, but it goes under the frame only, isn’t really stable for this type of work. 

I’ve also done stuff with it on my wheel ramps before, about 9″ of lift, but that’s still a PITA at times. 

Thus, my redneck Alaskan ATV lift.

My two old truck boxes (one a Rubbermaid chest, I wasn’t sure if it would take it, but it seems to not care about the weight! ), some scrap 2×12, and voila 16″ of lift! 

Front box being wider turned out great, didn’t plan it, but it’s enough to straddle and sit on, or stand on if needed.

Should have took pics of the first try getting it up there… Used my wheel ramps and one turned over after the front wheels when up… Was awkward getting it off at an angle with no ramp under one side. Lol. 

Categories: Alaska-Life, ATV, ATV Accessories, ATVing, Custom, Improviser, MacGyver, MacGyverism, Modifications, Repurpose, Vehicles, Wrenching | 2 Comments

ATV Auxiliary Fuse Block

I got tired of running everythi g straight off the battery… Was running out of space for the wires around the terminals too.   

A lot you don’t get to see here, like removal of the front inner fenders,  pulling the rack and tank cover, and routing wires… 

I have it now run as;

Battery-> main fuse-> key switch-> signal into relay-> 

And the battery-> relay(switched)-> fuse panel.

I tapped the keyed hot wire that I previously tapped for winch switch signal, -what was the speedometer power wire-.
That activates an 80A relay. The relay hot activates a heavy 10ga wire from the battery, to the new fuse block.  I didn’t have one on hand, so later I need to add a heavy 60A or 70A fuse between the battery and the relay. 

Relay wiring;


Battery box wiring, fuse for relay activation is the black spade holder center frame.

Relay next to battery

Also found that even with key off, I have 0.10V after the relay… It’s bleeding power. But there is no amperage there, so no drain, it’s fine. (Or so my electronics technician friend tells me 😉 ).

The box will also house a switch panel when I’m done, thus it’s placement on the fender(and honestly it’s getting hard to find places to put wiring on this thing!)

When done I’ll have that fancy split wire loom/cover stuff on the wires. Will also silicone seal all box holes, and some connections.


Categories: ATV, ATV Accessories, Custom, Modifications, Vehicles, Wiring | Leave a comment

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